ID CVE-2015-7704
Summary The ntpd client in NTP 4.x before 4.2.8p4 and 4.3.x before 4.3.77 allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service via a number of crafted "KOD" messages.
References
Vulnerable Configurations
  • NTP 4.2.0
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.0
  • NTP 4.2.2
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.2
  • NTP 4.2.2 Patch 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.2:p1
  • NTP 4.2.2 Patch 2
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.2:p2
  • NTP 4.2.2 Patch 3
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.2:p3
  • NTP 4.2.2 Patch 4
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.2:p4
  • NTP 4.2.4
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.4
  • NTP 4.2.4 Patch 0
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.4:p0
  • NTP 4.2.4 Patch 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.4:p1
  • NTP 4.2.4 Patch 2
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.4:p2
  • NTP 4.2.4 Patch 3
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.4:p3
  • NTP 4.2.4 Patch 4
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.4:p4
  • NTP 4.2.4 Patch 5
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.4:p5
  • NTP 4.2.4 Patch 6
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.4:p6
  • NTP 4.2.4 Patch 7
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.4:p7
  • NTP 4.2.4 Patch 7 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.4:p7_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.4 Patch 7 Release Candidate 2
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.4:p7_rc2
  • NTP 4.2.4 Patch 7 Release Candidate 3
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.4:p7_rc3
  • NTP 4.2.4 Patch 7 Release Candidate 4
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.4:p7_rc4
  • NTP 4.2.4 Patch 7 Release Candidate 5
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.4:p7_rc5
  • NTP 4.2.4 Patch 7 Release Candidate 6
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.4:p7_rc6
  • NTP 4.2.4 Patch 7 Release Candidate 7
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.4:p7_rc7
  • NTP 4.2.4 Patch 8
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.4:p8
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 124
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p124
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 125
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p125
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 126
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p126
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 127
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p127
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 128
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p128
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 129
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p129
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 130
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p130
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 131
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p131
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 132
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p132
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 133
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p133
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 134
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p134
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 135
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p135
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 136
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p136
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 137
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p137
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 138
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p138
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 139
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p139
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 140
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p140
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 141
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p141
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 142
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p142
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 143
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p143
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 144
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p144
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 145
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p145
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 146
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p146
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 147
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p147
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 148
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p148
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 149
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p149
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 150
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p150
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 151
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p151
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 152
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p152
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 153
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p153
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 154
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p154
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 155
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p155
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 156
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p156
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 157
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p157
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 158
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p158
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 159
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p159
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 160
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p160
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 161
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p161
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 162
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p162
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 163
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p163
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 164
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p164
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 165
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p165
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 166
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p166
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 167
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p167
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 168
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p168
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 169
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p169
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 170
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p170
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 171
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p171
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 172
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p172
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 173
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p173
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 174
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p174
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 175
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p175
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 176
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p176
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 177
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p177
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 178
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p178
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 179
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p179
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 180
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p180
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 181
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p181
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 182
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p182
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 183
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p183
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 184
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p184
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 185
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p185
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 186
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p186
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 187
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p187
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 188
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p188
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 189
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p189
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 190
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p190
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 191
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p191
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 192
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p192
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 193
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p193
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 194
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p194
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 195
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p195
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 196
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p196
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 197
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p197
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 198
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p198
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 199
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p199
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 200
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p200
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 201
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p201
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 202
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p202
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 203
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p203
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 204
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p204
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 205
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p205
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 206
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p206
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 207
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p207
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 208
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p208
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 209
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p209
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 210
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p210
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 211
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p211
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 212
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p212
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 213
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p213
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 214
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p214
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 215
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p215
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 216
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p216
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 217
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p217
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 218
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p218
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 219
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p219
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 220
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p220
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 221
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p221
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 222
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p222
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 223
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p223
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 224
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p224
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 225
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p225
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 226
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p226
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 227
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p227
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 228
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p228
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 229
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p229
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 230
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p230
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 231 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p231_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 232 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p232_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 233 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p233_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 234 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p234_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 235 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p235_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 236 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p236_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 237 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p237_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 238 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p238_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 239 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p239_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 240 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p240_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 241 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p241_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 242 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p242_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 243 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p243_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 244 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p244_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 245 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p245_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 246 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p246_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 247 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p247_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 248 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p248_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 249 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p249_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.5 Patch 250 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.5:p250_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.6
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p1
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 1 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p1_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 1 Release Candidate 2
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p1_rc2
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 1 Release Candidate 3
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p1_rc3
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 1 Release Candidate 4
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p1_rc4
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 1 Release Candidate 5
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p1_rc5
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 1 Release Candidate 6
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p1_rc6
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 2
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p2
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 2 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p2_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 2 Release Candidate 2
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p2_rc2
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 2 Release Candidate 3
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p2_rc3
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 2 Release Candidate 4
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p2_rc4
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 2 Release Candidate 5
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p2_rc5
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 2 Release Candidate 6
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p2_rc6
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 2 Release Candidate 7
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p2_rc7
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 3
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p3
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 3 Beta 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p3_beta1
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 3 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p3_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 3 Release Candidate 10
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p3_rc10
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 3 Release Candidate 11
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p3_rc11
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 3 Release Candidate 12
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p3_rc12
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 3 Release Candidate 2
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p3_rc2
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 3 Release Candidate 3
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p3_rc3
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 3 Release Candidate 4
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p3_rc4
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 3 Release Candidate 5
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p3_rc5
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 3 Release Candidate 6
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p3_rc6
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 3 Release Candidate 7
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p3_rc7
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 3 Release Candidate 8
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p3_rc8
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 3 Release Candidate 9
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p3_rc9
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 4
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p4
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 4 Beta 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p4_beta1
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 4 Beta 2
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p4_beta2
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 4 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p4_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 4 Release Candidate 2
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p4_rc2
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 5
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p5
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 5 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p5_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 5 Release Candidate 2
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p5_rc2
  • NTP 4.2.6 Patch 5 Release Candidate 3
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.6:p5_rc3
  • NTP 4.2.7
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 0
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p0
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p1
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 10
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p10
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 100
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p100
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 101
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p101
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 102
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p102
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 103
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p103
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 104
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p104
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 11
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 16
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 17
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 19
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 2
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 23
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 24
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 25
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 259
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 26
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 264
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 269
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 27
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 270
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 273
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 274
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 276
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 277
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 278
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 279
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 28
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 280
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 281
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 282
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 283
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 284
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 285
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 286
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 287
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 288
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 289
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 29
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 290
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 291
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 292
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 293
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 294
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 295
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 296
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 469
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 47
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 470
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 473
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 478
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 48
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 480
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  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 483
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p483
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 484 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p484_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 485 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p485_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 486 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p486_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 49
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p49
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 5
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p5
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 50
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p50
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 51
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p51
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 52
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p52
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 53
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p53
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 54
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p54
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 55
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p55
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 56
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p56
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 57
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p57
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 58
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p58
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 59
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p59
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 6
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p6
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 60
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p60
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 61
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p61
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 62
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p62
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 63
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p63
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 64
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p64
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 65
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p65
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 66
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p66
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 67
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p67
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 68
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p68
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 69
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p69
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 7
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p7
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 70
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p70
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 71
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p71
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 72
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p72
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 73
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p73
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 74
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p74
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 75
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p75
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 76
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p76
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 77
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p77
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 78
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p78
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 79
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p79
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 8
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p8
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 80
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p80
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 81
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p81
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 82
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p82
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 83
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p83
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 84
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p84
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 85
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p85
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 86
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p86
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 87
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p87
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 88
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p88
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 89
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p89
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 9
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p9
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 90
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p90
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 91
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p91
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 92
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p92
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 93
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p93
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 94
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p94
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 95
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p95
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 96
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p96
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 97
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p97
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 98
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p98
  • NTP 4.2.7 Patch 99
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7:p99
  • NTP NTP 4.2.7p444
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.7p444
  • NTP NTP 4.2.8
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.8
  • NTP 4.2.8 Patch 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.8:p1
  • NTP 4.2.8 Patch 1 Beta 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.8:p1_beta1
  • NTP 4.2.8 Patch 1 Beta 2
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.8:p1_beta2
  • NTP 4.2.8 Patch 1 Beta 3
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.8:p1_beta3
  • NTP 4.2.8 Patch 1 Beta 4
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.8:p1_beta4
  • NTP 4.2.8 Patch 1 Beta5
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.8:p1_beta5
  • NTP 4.2.8 Patch 1 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.8:p1_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.8 Patch 1 Release Candidate 2
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.8:p1_rc2
  • NTP 4.2.8 Patch 2
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.8:p2
  • NTP 4.2.8 Patch 2 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.8:p2_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.8 Patch 2 Release Candidate 2
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.8:p2_rc2
  • NTP 4.2.8 Patch 2 Release Candidate 3
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.8:p2_rc3
  • NTP 4.2.8 Patch 3
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.8:p3
  • NTP 4.2.8 Patch 3 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.8:p3_rc1
  • NTP 4.2.8 Patch 3 Release Candidate 2
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.8:p3_rc2
  • NTP 4.2.8 Patch 3 Release Candidate 3
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.2.8:p3_rc3
  • NTP 4.3.0
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.0
  • NTP 4.3.1
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.1
  • NTP 4.3.2
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.2
  • NTP 4.3.3
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.3
  • NTP 4.3.4
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.4
  • NTP 4.3.5
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.5
  • NTP 4.3.6
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.6
  • NTP 4.3.7
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.7
  • NTP 4.3.8
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.8
  • NTP 4.3.9
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.9
  • NTP 4.3.10
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.10
  • NTP 4.3.11
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.11
  • NTP 4.3.12
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.12
  • NTP 4.3.13
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.13
  • NTP 4.3.14
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.14
  • NTP 4.3.15
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.15
  • NTP 4.3.16
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.16
  • NTP 4.3.17
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.17
  • NTP 4.3.18
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.18
  • NTP 4.3.19
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.19
  • NTP 4.3.20
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.20
  • NTP 4.3.21
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.21
  • NTP 4.3.22
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.22
  • NTP 4.3.23
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.23
  • NTP 4.3.24
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.24
  • NTP 4.3.25
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.25
  • NTP 4.3.26
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.26
  • NTP 4.3.27
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.27
  • NTP 4.3.28
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.28
  • NTP 4.3.29
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.29
  • NTP 4.3.30
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.30
  • NTP 4.3.31
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.31
  • NTP 4.3.32
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.32
  • NTP 4.3.33
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.33
  • NTP 4.3.34
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.34
  • NTP 4.3.35
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.35
  • NTP 4.3.36
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.36
  • NTP 4.3.37
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.37
  • NTP 4.3.38
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.38
  • NTP 4.3.39
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.39
  • NTP 4.3.40
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.40
  • NTP 4.3.41
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.41
  • NTP 4.3.42
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.42
  • NTP 4.3.43
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.43
  • NTP 4.3.44
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.44
  • NTP 4.3.45
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.45
  • NTP 4.3.46
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.46
  • NTP 4.3.47
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.47
  • NTP 4.3.48
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.48
  • NTP 4.3.49
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.49
  • NTP 4.3.50
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.50
  • NTP 4.3.51
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.51
  • NTP 4.3.52
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.52
  • NTP 4.3.53
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.53
  • NTP 4.3.54
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.54
  • NTP 4.3.55
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.55
  • NTP 4.3.56
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.56
  • NTP 4.3.57
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.57
  • NTP 4.3.58
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.58
  • NTP 4.3.59
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.59
  • NTP 4.3.60
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.60
  • NTP 4.3.61
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.61
  • NTP 4.3.62
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.62
  • NTP 4.3.63
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.63
  • NTP 4.3.64
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.64
  • NTP 4.3.65
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.65
  • NTP 4.3.66
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.66
  • NTP 4.3.67
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.67
  • NTP 4.3.68
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.68
  • NTP 4.3.69
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.69
  • NTP 4.3.70
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.70
  • NTP 4.3.71
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.71
  • NTP 4.3.72
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.72
  • NTP 4.3.73
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.73
  • NTP 4.3.74
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.74
  • NTP 4.3.75
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.75
  • NTP 4.3.76
    cpe:2.3:a:ntp:ntp:4.3.76
CVSS
Base: 5.0
Impact:
Exploitability:
CWE CWE-20
CAPEC
  • Buffer Overflow via Environment Variables
    This attack pattern involves causing a buffer overflow through manipulation of environment variables. Once the attacker finds that they can modify an environment variable, they may try to overflow associated buffers. This attack leverages implicit trust often placed in environment variables.
  • Server Side Include (SSI) Injection
    An attacker can use Server Side Include (SSI) Injection to send code to a web application that then gets executed by the web server. Doing so enables the attacker to achieve similar results to Cross Site Scripting, viz., arbitrary code execution and information disclosure, albeit on a more limited scale, since the SSI directives are nowhere near as powerful as a full-fledged scripting language. Nonetheless, the attacker can conveniently gain access to sensitive files, such as password files, and execute shell commands.
  • Cross Zone Scripting
    An attacker is able to cause a victim to load content into their web-browser that bypasses security zone controls and gain access to increased privileges to execute scripting code or other web objects such as unsigned ActiveX controls or applets. This is a privilege elevation attack targeted at zone-based web-browser security. In a zone-based model, pages belong to one of a set of zones corresponding to the level of privilege assigned to that page. Pages in an untrusted zone would have a lesser level of access to the system and/or be restricted in the types of executable content it was allowed to invoke. In a cross-zone scripting attack, a page that should be assigned to a less privileged zone is granted the privileges of a more trusted zone. This can be accomplished by exploiting bugs in the browser, exploiting incorrect configuration in the zone controls, through a cross-site scripting attack that causes the attackers' content to be treated as coming from a more trusted page, or by leveraging some piece of system functionality that is accessible from both the trusted and less trusted zone. This attack differs from "Restful Privilege Escalation" in that the latter correlates to the inadequate securing of RESTful access methods (such as HTTP DELETE) on the server, while cross-zone scripting attacks the concept of security zones as implemented by a browser.
  • Cross Site Scripting through Log Files
    An attacker may leverage a system weakness where logs are susceptible to log injection to insert scripts into the system's logs. If these logs are later viewed by an administrator through a thin administrative interface and the log data is not properly HTML encoded before being written to the page, the attackers' scripts stored in the log will be executed in the administrative interface with potentially serious consequences. This attack pattern is really a combination of two other attack patterns: log injection and stored cross site scripting.
  • Command Line Execution through SQL Injection
    An attacker uses standard SQL injection methods to inject data into the command line for execution. This could be done directly through misuse of directives such as MSSQL_xp_cmdshell or indirectly through injection of data into the database that would be interpreted as shell commands. Sometime later, an unscrupulous backend application (or could be part of the functionality of the same application) fetches the injected data stored in the database and uses this data as command line arguments without performing proper validation. The malicious data escapes that data plane by spawning new commands to be executed on the host.
  • Object Relational Mapping Injection
    An attacker leverages a weakness present in the database access layer code generated with an Object Relational Mapping (ORM) tool or a weakness in the way that a developer used a persistence framework to inject his or her own SQL commands to be executed against the underlying database. The attack here is similar to plain SQL injection, except that the application does not use JDBC to directly talk to the database, but instead it uses a data access layer generated by an ORM tool or framework (e.g. Hibernate). While most of the time code generated by an ORM tool contains safe access methods that are immune to SQL injection, sometimes either due to some weakness in the generated code or due to the fact that the developer failed to use the generated access methods properly, SQL injection is still possible.
  • SQL Injection through SOAP Parameter Tampering
    An attacker modifies the parameters of the SOAP message that is sent from the service consumer to the service provider to initiate a SQL injection attack. On the service provider side, the SOAP message is parsed and parameters are not properly validated before being used to access a database in a way that does not use parameter binding, thus enabling the attacker to control the structure of the executed SQL query. This pattern describes a SQL injection attack with the delivery mechanism being a SOAP message.
  • Subverting Environment Variable Values
    The attacker directly or indirectly modifies environment variables used by or controlling the target software. The attacker's goal is to cause the target software to deviate from its expected operation in a manner that benefits the attacker.
  • Format String Injection
    An attacker includes formatting characters in a string input field on the target application. Most applications assume that users will provide static text and may respond unpredictably to the presence of formatting character. For example, in certain functions of the C programming languages such as printf, the formatting character %s will print the contents of a memory location expecting this location to identify a string and the formatting character %n prints the number of DWORD written in the memory. An attacker can use this to read or write to memory locations or files, or simply to manipulate the value of the resulting text in unexpected ways. Reading or writing memory may result in program crashes and writing memory could result in the execution of arbitrary code if the attacker can write to the program stack.
  • LDAP Injection
    An attacker manipulates or crafts an LDAP query for the purpose of undermining the security of the target. Some applications use user input to create LDAP queries that are processed by an LDAP server. For example, a user might provide their username during authentication and the username might be inserted in an LDAP query during the authentication process. An attacker could use this input to inject additional commands into an LDAP query that could disclose sensitive information. For example, entering a * in the aforementioned query might return information about all users on the system. This attack is very similar to an SQL injection attack in that it manipulates a query to gather additional information or coerce a particular return value.
  • Relative Path Traversal
    An attacker exploits a weakness in input validation on the target by supplying a specially constructed path utilizing dot and slash characters for the purpose of obtaining access to arbitrary files or resources. An attacker modifies a known path on the target in order to reach material that is not available through intended channels. These attacks normally involve adding additional path separators (/ or \) and/or dots (.), or encodings thereof, in various combinations in order to reach parent directories or entirely separate trees of the target's directory structure.
  • Client-side Injection-induced Buffer Overflow
    This type of attack exploits a buffer overflow vulnerability in targeted client software through injection of malicious content from a custom-built hostile service.
  • Variable Manipulation
    An attacker manipulates variables used by an application to perform a variety of possible attacks. This can either be performed through the manipulation of function call parameters or by manipulating external variables, such as environment variables, that are used by an application. Changing variable values is usually undertaken as part of another attack; for example, a path traversal (inserting relative path modifiers) or buffer overflow (enlarging a variable value beyond an application's ability to store it).
  • Embedding Scripts in Non-Script Elements
    This attack is a form of Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) where malicious scripts are embedded in elements that are not expected to host scripts such as image tags (<img>), comments in XML documents (< !-CDATA->), etc. These tags may not be subject to the same input validation, output validation, and other content filtering and checking routines, so this can create an opportunity for an attacker to tunnel through the application's elements and launch a XSS attack through other elements. As with all remote attacks, it is important to differentiate the ability to launch an attack (such as probing an internal network for unpatched servers) and the ability of the remote attacker to collect and interpret the output of said attack.
  • Flash Injection
    An attacker tricks a victim to execute malicious flash content that executes commands or makes flash calls specified by the attacker. One example of this attack is cross-site flashing, an attacker controlled parameter to a reference call loads from content specified by the attacker.
  • Cross-Site Scripting Using Alternate Syntax
    The attacker uses alternate forms of keywords or commands that result in the same action as the primary form but which may not be caught by filters. For example, many keywords are processed in a case insensitive manner. If the site's web filtering algorithm does not convert all tags into a consistent case before the comparison with forbidden keywords it is possible to bypass filters (e.g., incomplete black lists) by using an alternate case structure. For example, the "script" tag using the alternate forms of "Script" or "ScRiPt" may bypass filters where "script" is the only form tested. Other variants using different syntax representations are also possible as well as using pollution meta-characters or entities that are eventually ignored by the rendering engine. The attack can result in the execution of otherwise prohibited functionality.
  • Exploiting Trust in Client (aka Make the Client Invisible)
    An attack of this type exploits a programs' vulnerabilities in client/server communication channel authentication and data integrity. It leverages the implicit trust a server places in the client, or more importantly, that which the server believes is the client. An attacker executes this type of attack by placing themselves in the communication channel between client and server such that communication directly to the server is possible where the server believes it is communicating only with a valid client. There are numerous variations of this type of attack.
  • XML Nested Payloads
    Applications often need to transform data in and out of the XML format by using an XML parser. It may be possible for an attacker to inject data that may have an adverse effect on the XML parser when it is being processed. By nesting XML data and causing this data to be continuously self-referential, an attacker can cause the XML parser to consume more resources while processing, causing excessive memory consumption and CPU utilization. An attacker's goal is to leverage parser failure to his or her advantage. In most cases this type of an attack will result in a denial of service due to an application becoming unstable, freezing, or crash. However it may be possible to cause a crash resulting in arbitrary code execution, leading to a jump from the data plane to the control plane [R.230.1].
  • XML Oversized Payloads
    Applications often need to transform data in and out of the XML format by using an XML parser. It may be possible for an attacker to inject data that may have an adverse effect on the XML parser when it is being processed. By supplying oversized payloads in input vectors that will be processed by the XML parser, an attacker can cause the XML parser to consume more resources while processing, causing excessive memory consumption and CPU utilization, and potentially cause execution of arbitrary code. An attacker's goal is to leverage parser failure to his or her advantage. In many cases this type of an attack will result in a denial of service due to an application becoming unstable, freezing, or crash. However it is possible to cause a crash resulting in arbitrary code execution, leading to a jump from the data plane to the control plane [R.231.1].
  • Filter Failure through Buffer Overflow
    In this attack, the idea is to cause an active filter to fail by causing an oversized transaction. An attacker may try to feed overly long input strings to the program in an attempt to overwhelm the filter (by causing a buffer overflow) and hoping that the filter does not fail securely (i.e. the user input is let into the system unfiltered).
  • Cross-Site Scripting via Encoded URI Schemes
    An attack of this type exploits the ability of most browsers to interpret "data", "javascript" or other URI schemes as client-side executable content placeholders. This attack consists of passing a malicious URI in an anchor tag HREF attribute or any other similar attributes in other HTML tags. Such malicious URI contains, for example, a base64 encoded HTML content with an embedded cross-site scripting payload. The attack is executed when the browser interprets the malicious content i.e., for example, when the victim clicks on the malicious link.
  • XML Injection
    An attacker utilizes crafted XML user-controllable input to probe, attack, and inject data into the XML database, using techniques similar to SQL injection. The user-controllable input can allow for unauthorized viewing of data, bypassing authentication or the front-end application for direct XML database access, and possibly altering database information.
  • Environment Variable Manipulation
    An attacker manipulates environment variables used by an application to perform a variety of possible attacks. Changing variable values is usually undertaken as part of another attack; for example, a path traversal (inserting relative path modifiers) or buffer overflow (enlarging a variable value beyond an application's ability to store it).
  • Global variable manipulation
    An attacker manipulates global variables used by an application to perform a variety of possible attacks. Changing variable values is usually undertaken as part of another attack; for example, a path traversal (inserting relative path modifiers) or buffer overflow (enlarging a variable value beyond an application's ability to store it).
  • Leverage Alternate Encoding
    This attack leverages the possibility to encode potentially harmful input and submit it to applications not expecting or effective at validating this encoding standard making input filtering difficult.
  • Fuzzing
    Fuzzing is a software testing method that feeds randomly constructed input to the system and looks for an indication that a failure in response to that input has occurred. Fuzzing treats the system as a black box and is totally free from any preconceptions or assumptions about the system. An attacker can leverage fuzzing to try to identify weaknesses in the system. For instance fuzzing can help an attacker discover certain assumptions made in the system about user input. Fuzzing gives an attacker a quick way of potentially uncovering some of these assumptions without really knowing anything about the internals of the system. These assumptions can then be turned against the system by specially crafting user input that may allow an attacker to achieve his goals.
  • Using Leading 'Ghost' Character Sequences to Bypass Input Filters
    An attacker intentionally introduces leading characters that enable getting the input past the filters. The API that is being targeted, ignores the leading "ghost" characters, and therefore processes the attackers' input. This occurs when the targeted API will accept input data in several syntactic forms and interpret it in the equivalent semantic way, while the filter does not take into account the full spectrum of the syntactic forms acceptable to the targeted API. Some APIs will strip certain leading characters from a string of parameters. Perhaps these characters are considered redundant, and for this reason they are removed. Another possibility is the parser logic at the beginning of analysis is specialized in some way that causes some characters to be removed. The attacker can specify multiple types of alternative encodings at the beginning of a string as a set of probes. One commonly used possibility involves adding ghost characters--extra characters that don't affect the validity of the request at the API layer. If the attacker has access to the API libraries being targeted, certain attack ideas can be tested directly in advance. Once alternative ghost encodings emerge through testing, the attacker can move from lab-based API testing to testing real-world service implementations.
  • Accessing/Intercepting/Modifying HTTP Cookies
    This attack relies on the use of HTTP Cookies to store credentials, state information and other critical data on client systems. The first form of this attack involves accessing HTTP Cookies to mine for potentially sensitive data contained therein. The second form of this attack involves intercepting this data as it is transmitted from client to server. This intercepted information is then used by the attacker to impersonate the remote user/session. The third form is when the cookie's content is modified by the attacker before it is sent back to the server. Here the attacker seeks to convince the target server to operate on this falsified information.
  • Embedding Scripts in HTTP Query Strings
    A variant of cross-site scripting called "reflected" cross-site scripting, the HTTP Query Strings attack consists of passing a malicious script inside an otherwise valid HTTP request query string. This is of significant concern for sites that rely on dynamic, user-generated content such as bulletin boards, news sites, blogs, and web enabled administration GUIs. The malicious script may steal session data, browse history, probe files, or otherwise execute attacks on the client side. Once the attacker has prepared the malicious HTTP query it is sent to a victim user (perhaps by email, IM, or posted on an online forum), who clicks on a normal looking link that contains a poison query string. This technique can be made more effective through the use of services like http://tinyurl.com/, which makes very small URLs that will redirect to very large, complex ones. The victim will not know what he is really clicking on.
  • MIME Conversion
    An attacker exploits a weakness in the MIME conversion routine to cause a buffer overflow and gain control over the mail server machine. The MIME system is designed to allow various different information formats to be interpreted and sent via e-mail. Attack points exist when data are converted to MIME compatible format and back.
  • Exploiting Multiple Input Interpretation Layers
    An attacker supplies the target software with input data that contains sequences of special characters designed to bypass input validation logic. This exploit relies on the target making multiples passes over the input data and processing a "layer" of special characters with each pass. In this manner, the attacker can disguise input that would otherwise be rejected as invalid by concealing it with layers of special/escape characters that are stripped off by subsequent processing steps. The goal is to first discover cases where the input validation layer executes before one or more parsing layers. That is, user input may go through the following logic in an application: In such cases, the attacker will need to provide input that will pass through the input validator, but after passing through parser2, will be converted into something that the input validator was supposed to stop.
  • Buffer Overflow via Symbolic Links
    This type of attack leverages the use of symbolic links to cause buffer overflows. An attacker can try to create or manipulate a symbolic link file such that its contents result in out of bounds data. When the target software processes the symbolic link file, it could potentially overflow internal buffers with insufficient bounds checking.
  • Overflow Variables and Tags
    This type of attack leverages the use of tags or variables from a formatted configuration data to cause buffer overflow. The attacker crafts a malicious HTML page or configuration file that includes oversized strings, thus causing an overflow.
  • Buffer Overflow via Parameter Expansion
    In this attack, the target software is given input that the attacker knows will be modified and expanded in size during processing. This attack relies on the target software failing to anticipate that the expanded data may exceed some internal limit, thereby creating a buffer overflow.
  • Signature Spoof
    An attacker generates a message or datablock that causes the recipient to believe that the message or datablock was generated and cryptographically signed by an authoritative or reputable source, misleading a victim or victim operating system into performing malicious actions.
  • XML Client-Side Attack
    Client applications such as web browsers that process HTML data often need to transform data in and out of the XML format by using an XML parser. It may be possible for an attacker to inject data that may have an adverse effect on the XML parser when it is being processed. These adverse effects may include the parser crashing, consuming too much of a resource, executing too slowly, executing code supplied by an attacker, allowing usage of unintended system functionality, etc. An attacker's goal is to leverage parser failure to his or her advantage. In some cases it may be possible to jump from the data plane to the control plane via bad data being passed to an XML parser. [R.484.1]
  • Embedding NULL Bytes
    An attacker embeds one or more null bytes in input to the target software. This attack relies on the usage of a null-valued byte as a string terminator in many environments. The goal is for certain components of the target software to stop processing the input when it encounters the null byte(s).
  • Postfix, Null Terminate, and Backslash
    If a string is passed through a filter of some kind, then a terminal NULL may not be valid. Using alternate representation of NULL allows an attacker to embed the NULL mid-string while postfixing the proper data so that the filter is avoided. One example is a filter that looks for a trailing slash character. If a string insertion is possible, but the slash must exist, an alternate encoding of NULL in mid-string may be used.
  • Simple Script Injection
    An attacker embeds malicious scripts in content that will be served to web browsers. The goal of the attack is for the target software, the client-side browser, to execute the script with the users' privilege level. An attack of this type exploits a programs' vulnerabilities that are brought on by allowing remote hosts to execute code and scripts. Web browsers, for example, have some simple security controls in place, but if a remote attacker is allowed to execute scripts (through injecting them in to user-generated content like bulletin boards) then these controls may be bypassed. Further, these attacks are very difficult for an end user to detect.
  • Using Slashes and URL Encoding Combined to Bypass Validation Logic
    This attack targets the encoding of the URL combined with the encoding of the slash characters. An attacker can take advantage of the multiple way of encoding an URL and abuse the interpretation of the URL. An URL may contain special character that need special syntax handling in order to be interpreted. Special characters are represented using a percentage character followed by two digits representing the octet code of the original character (%HEX-CODE). For instance US-ASCII space character would be represented with %20. This is often referred as escaped ending or percent-encoding. Since the server decodes the URL from the requests, it may restrict the access to some URL paths by validating and filtering out the URL requests it received. An attacker will try to craft an URL with a sequence of special characters which once interpreted by the server will be equivalent to a forbidden URL. It can be difficult to protect against this attack since the URL can contain other format of encoding such as UTF-8 encoding, Unicode-encoding, etc.
  • SQL Injection
    This attack exploits target software that constructs SQL statements based on user input. An attacker crafts input strings so that when the target software constructs SQL statements based on the input, the resulting SQL statement performs actions other than those the application intended. SQL Injection results from failure of the application to appropriately validate input. When specially crafted user-controlled input consisting of SQL syntax is used without proper validation as part of SQL queries, it is possible to glean information from the database in ways not envisaged during application design. Depending upon the database and the design of the application, it may also be possible to leverage injection to have the database execute system-related commands of the attackers' choice. SQL Injection enables an attacker to talk directly to the database, thus bypassing the application completely. Successful injection can cause information disclosure as well as ability to add or modify data in the database. In order to successfully inject SQL and retrieve information from a database, an attacker:
  • String Format Overflow in syslog()
    This attack targets the format string vulnerabilities in the syslog() function. An attacker would typically inject malicious input in the format string parameter of the syslog function. This is a common problem, and many public vulnerabilities and associated exploits have been posted.
  • Blind SQL Injection
    Blind SQL Injection results from an insufficient mitigation for SQL Injection. Although suppressing database error messages are considered best practice, the suppression alone is not sufficient to prevent SQL Injection. Blind SQL Injection is a form of SQL Injection that overcomes the lack of error messages. Without the error messages that facilitate SQL Injection, the attacker constructs input strings that probe the target through simple Boolean SQL expressions. The attacker can determine if the syntax and structure of the injection was successful based on whether the query was executed or not. Applied iteratively, the attacker determines how and where the target is vulnerable to SQL Injection. For example, an attacker may try entering something like "username' AND 1=1; --" in an input field. If the result is the same as when the attacker entered "username" in the field, then the attacker knows that the application is vulnerable to SQL Injection. The attacker can then ask yes/no questions from the database server to extract information from it. For example, the attacker can extract table names from a database using the following types of queries: If the above query executes properly, then the attacker knows that the first character in a table name in the database is a letter between m and z. If it doesn't, then the attacker knows that the character must be between a and l (assuming of course that table names only contain alphabetic characters). By performing a binary search on all character positions, the attacker can determine all table names in the database. Subsequently, the attacker may execute an actual attack and send something like:
  • Using Unicode Encoding to Bypass Validation Logic
    An attacker may provide a Unicode string to a system component that is not Unicode aware and use that to circumvent the filter or cause the classifying mechanism to fail to properly understanding the request. That may allow the attacker to slip malicious data past the content filter and/or possibly cause the application to route the request incorrectly.
  • URL Encoding
    This attack targets the encoding of the URL. An attacker can take advantage of the multiple way of encoding an URL and abuse the interpretation of the URL. An URL may contain special character that need special syntax handling in order to be interpreted. Special characters are represented using a percentage character followed by two digits representing the octet code of the original character (%HEX-CODE). For instance US-ASCII space character would be represented with %20. This is often referred as escaped ending or percent-encoding. Since the server decodes the URL from the requests, it may restrict the access to some URL paths by validating and filtering out the URL requests it received. An attacker will try to craft an URL with a sequence of special characters which once interpreted by the server will be equivalent to a forbidden URL. It can be difficult to protect against this attack since the URL can contain other format of encoding such as UTF-8 encoding, Unicode-encoding, etc. The attacker could also subvert the meaning of the URL string request by encoding the data being sent to the server through a GET request. For instance an attacker may subvert the meaning of parameters used in a SQL request and sent through the URL string (See Example section).
  • User-Controlled Filename
    An attack of this type involves an attacker inserting malicious characters (such as a XSS redirection) into a filename, directly or indirectly that is then used by the target software to generate HTML text or other potentially executable content. Many websites rely on user-generated content and dynamically build resources like files, filenames, and URL links directly from user supplied data. In this attack pattern, the attacker uploads code that can execute in the client browser and/or redirect the client browser to a site that the attacker owns. All XSS attack payload variants can be used to pass and exploit these vulnerabilities.
  • Using Escaped Slashes in Alternate Encoding
    This attack targets the use of the backslash in alternate encoding. An attacker can provide a backslash as a leading character and causes a parser to believe that the next character is special. This is called an escape. By using that trick, the attacker tries to exploit alternate ways to encode the same character which leads to filter problems and opens avenues to attack.
  • Using Slashes in Alternate Encoding
    This attack targets the encoding of the Slash characters. An attacker would try to exploit common filtering problems related to the use of the slashes characters to gain access to resources on the target host. Directory-driven systems, such as file systems and databases, typically use the slash character to indicate traversal between directories or other container components. For murky historical reasons, PCs (and, as a result, Microsoft OSs) choose to use a backslash, whereas the UNIX world typically makes use of the forward slash. The schizophrenic result is that many MS-based systems are required to understand both forms of the slash. This gives the attacker many opportunities to discover and abuse a number of common filtering problems. The goal of this pattern is to discover server software that only applies filters to one version, but not the other.
  • Buffer Overflow in an API Call
    This attack targets libraries or shared code modules which are vulnerable to buffer overflow attacks. An attacker who has access to an API may try to embed malicious code in the API function call and exploit a buffer overflow vulnerability in the function's implementation. All clients that make use of the code library thus become vulnerable by association. This has a very broad effect on security across a system, usually affecting more than one software process.
  • Using UTF-8 Encoding to Bypass Validation Logic
    This attack is a specific variation on leveraging alternate encodings to bypass validation logic. This attack leverages the possibility to encode potentially harmful input in UTF-8 and submit it to applications not expecting or effective at validating this encoding standard making input filtering difficult. UTF-8 (8-bit UCS/Unicode Transformation Format) is a variable-length character encoding for Unicode. Legal UTF-8 characters are one to four bytes long. However, early version of the UTF-8 specification got some entries wrong (in some cases it permitted overlong characters). UTF-8 encoders are supposed to use the "shortest possible" encoding, but naive decoders may accept encodings that are longer than necessary. According to the RFC 3629, a particularly subtle form of this attack can be carried out against a parser which performs security-critical validity checks against the UTF-8 encoded form of its input, but interprets certain illegal octet sequences as characters.
  • Web Logs Tampering
    Web Logs Tampering attacks involve an attacker injecting, deleting or otherwise tampering with the contents of web logs typically for the purposes of masking other malicious behavior. Additionally, writing malicious data to log files may target jobs, filters, reports, and other agents that process the logs in an asynchronous attack pattern. This pattern of attack is similar to "Log Injection-Tampering-Forging" except that in this case, the attack is targeting the logs of the web server and not the application.
  • XPath Injection
    An attacker can craft special user-controllable input consisting of XPath expressions to inject the XML database and bypass authentication or glean information that he normally would not be able to. XPath Injection enables an attacker to talk directly to the XML database, thus bypassing the application completely. XPath Injection results from the failure of an application to properly sanitize input used as part of dynamic XPath expressions used to query an XML database. In order to successfully inject XML and retrieve information from a database, an attacker:
  • AJAX Fingerprinting
    This attack utilizes the frequent client-server roundtrips in Ajax conversation to scan a system. While Ajax does not open up new vulnerabilities per se, it does optimize them from an attacker point of view. In many XSS attacks the attacker must get a "hole in one" and successfully exploit the vulnerability on the victim side the first time, once the client is redirected the attacker has many chances to engage in follow on probes, but there is only one first chance. In a widely used web application this is not a major problem because 1 in a 1,000 is good enough in a widely used application. A common first step for an attacker is to footprint the environment to understand what attacks will work. Since footprinting relies on enumeration, the conversational pattern of rapid, multiple requests and responses that are typical in Ajax applications enable an attacker to look for many vulnerabilities, well-known ports, network locations and so on.
  • Embedding Script (XSS) in HTTP Headers
    An attack of this type exploits web applications that generate web content, such as links in a HTML page, based on unvalidated or improperly validated data submitted by other actors. XSS in HTTP Headers attacks target the HTTP headers which are hidden from most users and may not be validated by web applications.
  • OS Command Injection
    In this type of an attack, an adversary injects operating system commands into existing application functions. An application that uses untrusted input to build command strings is vulnerable. An adversary can leverage OS command injection in an application to elevate privileges, execute arbitrary commands and compromise the underlying operating system.
  • Buffer Overflow in Local Command-Line Utilities
    This attack targets command-line utilities available in a number of shells. An attacker can leverage a vulnerability found in a command-line utility to escalate privilege to root.
  • XSS in IMG Tags
    Image tags are an often overlooked, but convenient, means for a Cross Site Scripting attack. The attacker can inject script contents into an image (IMG) tag in order to steal information from a victim's browser and execute malicious scripts.
  • XML Parser Attack
    Applications often need to transform data in and out of the XML format by using an XML parser. It may be possible for an attacker to inject data that may have an adverse effect on the XML parser when it is being processed. These adverse effects may include the parser crashing, consuming too much of a resource, executing too slowly, executing code supplied by an attacker, allowing usage of unintended system functionality, etc. An attacker's goal is to leverage parser failure to his or her advantage. In some cases it may be possible to jump from the data plane to the control plane via bad data being passed to an XML parser. [R.99.1]
nessus via4
  • NASL family SuSE Local Security Checks
    NASL id SUSE_SU-2016-1311-1.NASL
    description This network time protocol server ntp was updated to 4.2.8p6 to fix the following issues : Also yast2-ntp-client was updated to match some sntp syntax changes. (bsc#937837) Major functional changes : - The 'sntp' commandline tool changed its option handling in a major way. - 'controlkey 1' is added during update to ntp.conf to allow sntp to work. - The local clock is being disabled during update. - ntpd is no longer running chrooted. Other functional changes : - ntp-signd is installed. - 'enable mode7' can be added to the configuration to allow ntdpc to work as compatibility mode option. - 'kod' was removed from the default restrictions. - SHA1 keys are used by default instead of MD5 keys. These security issues were fixed : - CVE-2015-5219: An endless loop due to incorrect precision to double conversion (bsc#943216). - CVE-2015-8158: Fixed potential infinite loop in ntpq (bsc#962966). - CVE-2015-8138: Zero Origin Timestamp Bypass (bsc#963002). - CVE-2015-7979: Off-path Denial of Service (DoS) attack on authenticated broadcast mode (bsc#962784). - CVE-2015-7978: Stack exhaustion in recursive traversal of restriction list (bsc#963000). - CVE-2015-7977: reslist NULL pointer dereference (bsc#962970). - CVE-2015-7976: ntpq saveconfig command allows dangerous characters in filenames (bsc#962802). - CVE-2015-7975: nextvar() missing length check (bsc#962988). - CVE-2015-7974: Skeleton Key: Missing key check allows impersonation between authenticated peers (bsc#962960). - CVE-2015-7973: Replay attack on authenticated broadcast mode (bsc#962995). - CVE-2015-8140: ntpq vulnerable to replay attacks (bsc#962994). - CVE-2015-8139: Origin Leak: ntpq and ntpdc, disclose origin (bsc#962997). - CVE-2015-5300: MITM attacker could have forced ntpd to make a step larger than the panic threshold (bsc#951629). - CVE-2015-7871: NAK to the Future: Symmetric association authentication bypass via crypto-NAK (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7855: decodenetnum() will ASSERT botch instead of returning FAIL on some bogus values (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7854: Password Length Memory Corruption Vulnerability (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7853: Invalid length data provided by a custom refclock driver could cause a buffer overflow (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7852: ntpq atoascii() Memory Corruption Vulnerability (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7851: saveconfig Directory Traversal Vulnerability (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7850: remote config logfile-keyfile (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7849: trusted key use-after-free (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7848: mode 7 loop counter underrun (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7701: Slow memory leak in CRYPTO_ASSOC (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7703: configuration directives 'pidfile' and 'driftfile' should only be allowed locally (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7704, CVE-2015-7705: Clients that receive a KoD should validate the origin timestamp field (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7691, CVE-2015-7692, CVE-2015-7702: Incomplete autokey data packet length checks (bsc#951608). The update package also includes non-security fixes. See advisory for details. Note that Tenable Network Security has extracted the preceding description block directly from the SUSE security advisory. Tenable has attempted to automatically clean and format it as much as possible without introducing additional issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-29
    plugin id 91248
    published 2016-05-19
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=91248
    title SUSE SLES11 Security Update : ntp (SUSE-SU-2016:1311-1)
  • NASL family SuSE Local Security Checks
    NASL id SUSE_SU-2016-1568-1.NASL
    description ntp was updated to version 4.2.8p8 to fix 17 security issues. These security issues were fixed : - CVE-2016-4956: Broadcast interleave (bsc#982068). - CVE-2016-2518: Crafted addpeer with hmode > 7 causes array wraparound with MATCH_ASSOC (bsc#977457). - CVE-2016-2519: ctl_getitem() return value not always checked (bsc#977458). - CVE-2016-4954: Processing spoofed server packets (bsc#982066). - CVE-2016-4955: Autokey association reset (bsc#982067). - CVE-2015-7974: NTP did not verify peer associations of symmetric keys when authenticating packets, which might allowed remote attackers to conduct impersonation attacks via an arbitrary trusted key, aka a 'skeleton key (bsc#962960). - CVE-2016-4957: CRYPTO_NAK crash (bsc#982064). - CVE-2016-2516: Duplicate IPs on unconfig directives will cause an assertion botch (bsc#977452). - CVE-2016-2517: Remote configuration trustedkey/requestkey values are not properly validated (bsc#977455). - CVE-2016-4953: Bad authentication demobilizes ephemeral associations (bsc#982065). - CVE-2016-1547: CRYPTO-NAK DoS (bsc#977459). - CVE-2016-1551: Refclock impersonation vulnerability, AKA: refclock-peering (bsc#977450). - CVE-2016-1550: Improve NTP security against buffer comparison timing attacks, authdecrypt-timing, AKA: authdecrypt-timing (bsc#977464). - CVE-2016-1548: Interleave-pivot - MITIGATION ONLY (bsc#977461). - CVE-2016-1549: Sybil vulnerability: ephemeral association attack, AKA: ntp-sybil - MITIGATION ONLY (bsc#977451). This release also contained improved patches for CVE-2015-7704, CVE-2015-7705, CVE-2015-7974. The update package also includes non-security fixes. See advisory for details. Note that Tenable Network Security has extracted the preceding description block directly from the SUSE security advisory. Tenable has attempted to automatically clean and format it as much as possible without introducing additional issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-29
    plugin id 91663
    published 2016-06-17
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=91663
    title SUSE SLED12 / SLES12 Security Update : ntp (SUSE-SU-2016:1568-1)
  • NASL family Gentoo Local Security Checks
    NASL id GENTOO_GLSA-201607-15.NASL
    description The remote host is affected by the vulnerability described in GLSA-201607-15 (NTP: Multiple vulnerabilities) Multiple vulnerabilities have been discovered in NTP. Please review the CVE identifiers referenced below for details. Impact : A remote attacker could possibly cause a Denial of Service condition. Workaround : There is no known workaround at this time.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-01-26
    plugin id 92485
    published 2016-07-21
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=92485
    title GLSA-201607-15 : NTP: Multiple vulnerabilities
  • NASL family SuSE Local Security Checks
    NASL id SUSE_SU-2016-1247-1.NASL
    description ntp was updated to version 4.2.8p6 to fix 28 security issues. Major functional changes : - The 'sntp' commandline tool changed its option handling in a major way, some options have been renamed or dropped. - 'controlkey 1' is added during update to ntp.conf to allow sntp to work. - The local clock is being disabled during update. - ntpd is no longer running chrooted. Other functional changes : - ntp-signd is installed. - 'enable mode7' can be added to the configuration to allow ntdpc to work as compatibility mode option. - 'kod' was removed from the default restrictions. - SHA1 keys are used by default instead of MD5 keys. Also yast2-ntp-client was updated to match some sntp syntax changes. (bsc#937837) These security issues were fixed : - CVE-2015-8158: Fixed potential infinite loop in ntpq (bsc#962966). - CVE-2015-8138: Zero Origin Timestamp Bypass (bsc#963002). - CVE-2015-7979: Off-path Denial of Service (DoS) attack on authenticated broadcast mode (bsc#962784). - CVE-2015-7978: Stack exhaustion in recursive traversal of restriction list (bsc#963000). - CVE-2015-7977: reslist NULL pointer dereference (bsc#962970). - CVE-2015-7976: ntpq saveconfig command allows dangerous characters in filenames (bsc#962802). - CVE-2015-7975: nextvar() missing length check (bsc#962988). - CVE-2015-7974: Skeleton Key: Missing key check allows impersonation between authenticated peers (bsc#962960). - CVE-2015-7973: Replay attack on authenticated broadcast mode (bsc#962995). - CVE-2015-8140: ntpq vulnerable to replay attacks (bsc#962994). - CVE-2015-8139: Origin Leak: ntpq and ntpdc, disclose origin (bsc#962997). - CVE-2015-5300: MITM attacker could have forced ntpd to make a step larger than the panic threshold (bsc#951629). - CVE-2015-7871: NAK to the Future: Symmetric association authentication bypass via crypto-NAK (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7855: decodenetnum() will ASSERT botch instead of returning FAIL on some bogus values (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7854: Password Length Memory Corruption Vulnerability (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7853: Invalid length data provided by a custom refclock driver could cause a buffer overflow (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7852: ntpq atoascii() Memory Corruption Vulnerability (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7851: saveconfig Directory Traversal Vulnerability (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7850: remote config logfile-keyfile (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7849: trusted key use-after-free (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7848: mode 7 loop counter underrun (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7701: Slow memory leak in CRYPTO_ASSOC (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7703: configuration directives 'pidfile' and 'driftfile' should only be allowed locally (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7704, CVE-2015-7705: Clients that receive a KoD should validate the origin timestamp field (bsc#951608). - CVE-2015-7691, CVE-2015-7692, CVE-2015-7702: Incomplete autokey data packet length checks (bsc#951608). The update package also includes non-security fixes. See advisory for details. Note that Tenable Network Security has extracted the preceding description block directly from the SUSE security advisory. Tenable has attempted to automatically clean and format it as much as possible without introducing additional issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-29
    plugin id 90991
    published 2016-05-09
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=90991
    title SUSE SLED12 / SLES12 Security Update : ntp (SUSE-SU-2016:1247-1)
  • NASL family SuSE Local Security Checks
    NASL id OPENSUSE-2016-649.NASL
    description This update for ntp fixes the following issues : - Update to 4.2.8p7 (boo#977446) : - CVE-2016-1547, boo#977459: Validate crypto-NAKs, AKA: CRYPTO-NAK DoS. - CVE-2016-1548, boo#977461: Interleave-pivot - CVE-2016-1549, boo#977451: Sybil vulnerability: ephemeral association attack. - CVE-2016-1550, boo#977464: Improve NTP security against buffer comparison timing attacks. - CVE-2016-1551, boo#977450: Refclock impersonation vulnerability - CVE-2016-2516, boo#977452: Duplicate IPs on unconfig directives will cause an assertion botch in ntpd. - CVE-2016-2517, boo#977455: remote configuration trustedkey/ requestkey/controlkey values are not properly validated. - CVE-2016-2518, boo#977457: Crafted addpeer with hmode > 7 causes array wraparound with MATCH_ASSOC. - CVE-2016-2519, boo#977458: ctl_getitem() return value not always checked. - integrate ntp-fork.patch - Improve the fixes for: CVE-2015-7704, CVE-2015-7705, CVE-2015-7974 - Restrict the parser in the startup script to the first occurrance of 'keys' and 'controlkey' in ntp.conf (boo#957226). - Enable compile-time support for MS-SNTP (--enable-ntp-signd). This replaces the w32 patches in 4.2.4 that added the authreg directive. (fate#320758). - Fix ntp-sntp-dst.patch (boo#975496). - Call /usr/sbin/sntp with full path to synchronize in start-ntpd. When run as cron job, /usr/sbin/ is not in the path, which caused the synchronization to fail. (boo#962318) - Speedup ntpq (boo#782060, ntp-speedup-ntpq.patch). - Sync service files with openSUSE Factory. - Fix the TZ offset output of sntp during DST (boo#951559). - Add ntp-fork.patch and build with threads disabled to allow name resolution even when running chrooted. - Update to 4.2.8p6 : - CVE-2015-8158, boo#962966: Potential Infinite Loop in ntpq. - CVE-2015-8138, boo#963002: origin: Zero Origin Timestamp Bypass. - CVE-2015-7979, boo#962784: Off-path Denial of Service (DoS) attack on authenticated broadcast mode. - CVE-2015-7978, boo#963000: Stack exhaustion in recursive traversal of restriction list. - CVE-2015-7977, boo#962970: reslist NULL pointer dereference. - CVE-2015-7976, boo#962802: ntpq saveconfig command allows dangerous characters in filenames. - CVE-2015-7975, boo#962988: nextvar() missing length check. - CVE-2015-7974, boo#962960: Skeleton Key: Missing key check allows impersonation between authenticated peers. - CVE-2015-7973, boo#962995: Deja Vu: Replay attack on authenticated broadcast mode. - CVE-2015-8140: ntpq vulnerable to replay attacks. - CVE-2015-8139: Origin Leak: ntpq and ntpdc, disclose origin. - CVE-2015-5300, boo#951629: Small-step/Big-step. - Add /var/db/ntp-kod (boo#916617). - Add ntp-ENOBUFS.patch to limit a warning that might happen quite a lot on loaded systems (boo#956773). - add ntp.bug2965.diff (boo#954982) - fixes regression in 4.2.8p4 update - Update to 4.2.8p4 to fix several security issues (boo#951608) : - CVE-2015-7871: NAK to the Future: Symmetric association authentication bypass via crypto-NAK - CVE-2015-7855: decodenetnum() will ASSERT botch instead of returning FAIL on some bogus values - CVE-2015-7854: Password Length Memory Corruption Vulnerability - CVE-2015-7853: Invalid length data provided by a custom refclock driver could cause a buffer overflow - CVE-2015-7852 ntpq atoascii() Memory Corruption Vulnerability - CVE-2015-7851 saveconfig Directory Traversal Vulnerability - CVE-2015-7850 remote config logfile-keyfile - CVE-2015-7849 trusted key use-after-free - CVE-2015-7848 mode 7 loop counter underrun - CVE-2015-7701 Slow memory leak in CRYPTO_ASSOC - CVE-2015-7703 configuration directives 'pidfile' and 'driftfile' should only be allowed locally - CVE-2015-7704, CVE-2015-7705 Clients that receive a KoD should validate the origin timestamp field - CVE-2015-7691, CVE-2015-7692, CVE-2015-7702 Incomplete autokey data packet length checks - obsoletes ntp-memlock.patch. - Add a controlkey line to /etc/ntp.conf if one does not already exist to allow runtime configuuration via ntpq. - Temporarily disable memlock to avoid problems due to high memory usage during name resolution (boo#946386, ntp-memlock.patch). - Use SHA1 instead of MD5 for symmetric keys (boo#905885). - Improve runtime configuration : - Read keytype from ntp.conf - Don't write ntp keys to syslog. - Fix legacy action scripts to pass on command line arguments. - Remove ntp.1.gz, it wasn't installed anymore. - Remove ntp-4.2.7-rh-manpages.tar.gz and only keep ntptime.8.gz. The rest is partially irrelevant, partially redundant and potentially outdated (boo#942587). - Remove 'kod' from the restrict line in ntp.conf (boo#944300). - Use ntpq instead of deprecated ntpdc in start-ntpd (boo#936327). - Add a controlkey to ntp.conf to make the above work. - Don't let 'keysdir' lines in ntp.conf trigger the 'keys' parser. - Disable mode 7 (ntpdc) again, now that we don't use it anymore. - Add 'addserver' as a new legacy action. - Fix the comment regarding addserver in ntp.conf (boo#910063). - Update to version 4.2.8p3 which incorporates all security fixes and most other patches we have so far (fate#319040). More information on: http://archive.ntp.org/ntp4/ChangeLog-stable - Disable chroot by default (boo#926510). - Enable ntpdc for backwards compatibility (boo#920238). - Security fix: ntp-keygen may generate non-random symmetric keys
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-12-18
    plugin id 91403
    published 2016-06-01
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=91403
    title openSUSE Security Update : ntp (openSUSE-2016-649)
  • NASL family OracleVM Local Security Checks
    NASL id ORACLEVM_OVMSA-2015-0140.NASL
    description The remote OracleVM system is missing necessary patches to address critical security updates : - check origin timestamp before accepting KoD RATE packet (CVE-2015-7704) - allow only one step larger than panic threshold with -g (CVE-2015-5300)
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-07-24
    plugin id 86613
    published 2015-10-27
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=86613
    title OracleVM 3.3 : ntp (OVMSA-2015-0140)
  • NASL family Ubuntu Local Security Checks
    NASL id UBUNTU_USN-2783-1.NASL
    description Aleksis Kauppinen discovered that NTP incorrectly handled certain remote config packets. In a non-default configuration, a remote authenticated attacker could possibly use this issue to cause NTP to crash, resulting in a denial of service. (CVE-2015-5146) Miroslav Lichvar discovered that NTP incorrectly handled logconfig directives. In a non-default configuration, a remote authenticated attacker could possibly use this issue to cause NTP to crash, resulting in a denial of service. (CVE-2015-5194) Miroslav Lichvar discovered that NTP incorrectly handled certain statistics types. In a non-default configuration, a remote authenticated attacker could possibly use this issue to cause NTP to crash, resulting in a denial of service. (CVE-2015-5195) Miroslav Lichvar discovered that NTP incorrectly handled certain file paths. In a non-default configuration, a remote authenticated attacker could possibly use this issue to cause NTP to crash, resulting in a denial of service, or overwrite certain files. (CVE-2015-5196, CVE-2015-7703) Miroslav Lichvar discovered that NTP incorrectly handled certain packets. A remote attacker could possibly use this issue to cause NTP to hang, resulting in a denial of service. (CVE-2015-5219) Aanchal Malhotra, Isaac E. Cohen, and Sharon Goldberg discovered that NTP incorrectly handled restarting after hitting a panic threshold. A remote attacker could possibly use this issue to alter the system time on clients. (CVE-2015-5300) It was discovered that NTP incorrectly handled autokey data packets. A remote attacker could possibly use this issue to cause NTP to crash, resulting in a denial of service, or possibly execute arbitrary code. (CVE-2015-7691, CVE-2015-7692, CVE-2015-7702) It was discovered that NTP incorrectly handled memory when processing certain autokey messages. A remote attacker could possibly use this issue to cause NTP to consume memory, resulting in a denial of service. (CVE-2015-7701) Aanchal Malhotra, Isaac E. Cohen, and Sharon Goldberg discovered that NTP incorrectly handled rate limiting. A remote attacker could possibly use this issue to cause clients to stop updating their clock. (CVE-2015-7704, CVE-2015-7705) Yves Younan discovered that NTP incorrectly handled logfile and keyfile directives. In a non-default configuration, a remote authenticated attacker could possibly use this issue to cause NTP to enter a loop, resulting in a denial of service. (CVE-2015-7850) Yves Younan and Aleksander Nikolich discovered that NTP incorrectly handled ascii conversion. A remote attacker could possibly use this issue to cause NTP to crash, resulting in a denial of service, or possibly execute arbitrary code. (CVE-2015-7852) Yves Younan discovered that NTP incorrectly handled reference clock memory. A malicious refclock could possibly use this issue to cause NTP to crash, resulting in a denial of service, or possibly execute arbitrary code. (CVE-2015-7853) John D 'Doug' Birdwell discovered that NTP incorrectly handled decoding certain bogus values. An attacker could possibly use this issue to cause NTP to crash, resulting in a denial of service. (CVE-2015-7855) Stephen Gray discovered that NTP incorrectly handled symmetric association authentication. A remote attacker could use this issue to possibly bypass authentication and alter the system clock. (CVE-2015-7871) In the default installation, attackers would be isolated by the NTP AppArmor profile. Note that Tenable Network Security has extracted the preceding description block directly from the Ubuntu security advisory. Tenable has attempted to automatically clean and format it as much as possible without introducing additional issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-12-01
    plugin id 86630
    published 2015-10-28
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=86630
    title Ubuntu 12.04 LTS / 14.04 LTS / 15.04 / 15.10 : ntp vulnerabilities (USN-2783-1)
  • NASL family Misc.
    NASL id CITRIX_XENSERVER_CTX220112.NASL
    description The version of Citrix XenServer running on the remote host is missing a security hotfix. It is, therefore, affected by the following vulnerabilities : - A man-in-the-middle (MitM) vulnerability exists in the NTP component due to an improperly implemented threshold limitation for the '-g' option. A man-in-the-middle attacker can exploit this to intercept NTP traffic and return arbitrary date and time values to users. This vulnerability is only applicable if NTP is enabled. (CVE-2015-5300) - A denial of service vulnerability exists in the NTP component due to improper validation of the origin timestamp field when handling a Kiss-of-Death (KoD) packet. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to cause a client to stop querying its servers, preventing the client from updating its clock. This vulnerability is only applicable if NTP is enabled. (CVE-2015-7704) - A denial of service vulnerability exists in the NTP component due to improper implementation of rate-limiting when handling server queries. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to stop the client from querying its servers, preventing it from updating its clock. This vulnerability is only applicable if NTP is enabled. (CVE-2015-7705) - An unspecified flaw exists that allows an authenticated, remote attacker with read-only administrator access to corrupt the host database. This vulnerability is only applicable if RBAC is enabled. (CVE-2017-5572) - An unspecified flaw exists that allows an authenticated, remote attacker with read-only administration access to cancel the tasks of other administrators. This vulnerability is only applicable if RBAC is enabled. (CVE-2017-5573)
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-07-06
    plugin id 96928
    published 2017-02-01
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=96928
    title Citrix XenServer Multiple Vulnerabilities (CTX220112)
  • NASL family Misc.
    NASL id NTP_4_2_8P7.NASL
    description The version of the remote NTP server is 3.x or 4.x prior to 4.2.8p7. It is, therefore, affected by the following vulnerabilities : - A denial of service vulnerability exists due to improper validation of the origin timestamp field when handling a Kiss-of-Death (KoD) packet. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to cause a client to stop querying its servers, preventing the client from updating its clock. (CVE-2015-7704) - A flaw exists in the receive() function in ntp_proto.c that allows packets with an origin timestamp of zero to bypass security checks. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to spoof arbitrary content. (CVE-2015-8138) - A denial of service vulnerability exists due to improper handling of a crafted Crypto NAK Packet with a source address spoofed to match that of an existing associated peer. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to demobilize a client association. (CVE-2016-1547) - A denial of service vulnerability exists due to improper handling of packets spoofed to appear to be from a valid ntpd server. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to cause NTP to switch from basic client/server mode to interleaved symmetric mode, causing the client to reject future legitimate responses. (CVE-2016-1548) - A race condition exists that is triggered during the handling of a saturation of ephemeral associations. An authenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to defeat NTP's clock selection algorithm and modify a user's clock. (CVE-2016-1549) - An information disclosure vulnerability exists in the message authentication functionality in libntp that is triggered during the handling of a series of specially crafted messages. An adjacent attacker can exploit this to partially recover the message digest key. (CVE-2016-1550) - A flaw exists due to improper filtering of IPv4 'bogon' packets received from a network. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to spoof packets to appear to come from a specific reference clock. (CVE-2016-1551) - A denial of service vulnerability exists that allows an authenticated, remote attacker that has knowledge of the controlkey for ntpq or the requestkey for ntpdc to create a session with the same IP twice on an unconfigured directive line, causing ntpd to abort. (CVE-2016-2516) - A denial of service vulnerability exists that allows an authenticated, remote attacker to manipulate the value of the trustedkey, controlkey, or requestkey via a crafted packet, preventing authentication with ntpd until the daemon has been restarted. (CVE-2016-2517) - An out-of-bounds read error exists in the MATCH_ASSOC() function that occurs during the creation of peer associations with hmode greater than 7. An authenticated, remote attacker can exploit this, via a specially crafted packet, to cause a denial of service. (CVE-2016-2518) - An overflow condition exists in the ctl_getitem() function in ntpd due to improper validation of user-supplied input when reporting return values. An authenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to cause ntpd to abort. (CVE-2016-2519)
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2019-01-22
    plugin id 90923
    published 2016-05-05
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=90923
    title Network Time Protocol Daemon (ntpd) 3.x / 4.x < 4.2.8p7 Multiple Vulnerabilities
  • NASL family Misc.
    NASL id NTP_4_2_8P7.NASL
    description The version of the remote NTP server is 3.x or 4.x prior to 4.2.8p7. It is, therefore, affected by the following vulnerabilities : - A denial of service vulnerability exists due to improper validation of the origin timestamp field when handling a Kiss-of-Death (KoD) packet. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to cause a client to stop querying its servers, preventing the client from updating its clock. (CVE-2015-7704) - A flaw exists in the receive() function in ntp_proto.c that allows packets with an origin timestamp of zero to bypass security checks. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to spoof arbitrary content. (CVE-2015-8138) - A denial of service vulnerability exists due to improper handling of a crafted Crypto NAK Packet with a source address spoofed to match that of an existing associated peer. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to demobilize a client association. (CVE-2016-1547) - A denial of service vulnerability exists due to improper handling of packets spoofed to appear to be from a valid ntpd server. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to cause NTP to switch from basic client/server mode to interleaved symmetric mode, causing the client to reject future legitimate responses. (CVE-2016-1548) - A race condition exists that is triggered during the handling of a saturation of ephemeral associations. An authenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to defeat NTP's clock selection algorithm and modify a user's clock. (CVE-2016-1549) - An information disclosure vulnerability exists in the message authentication functionality in libntp that is triggered during the handling of a series of specially crafted messages. An adjacent attacker can exploit this to partially recover the message digest key. (CVE-2016-1550) - A flaw exists due to improper filtering of IPv4 'bogon' packets received from a network. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to spoof packets to appear to come from a specific reference clock. (CVE-2016-1551) - A denial of service vulnerability exists that allows an authenticated, remote attacker that has knowledge of the controlkey for ntpq or the requestkey for ntpdc to create a session with the same IP twice on an unconfigured directive line, causing ntpd to abort. (CVE-2016-2516) - A denial of service vulnerability exists that allows an authenticated, remote attacker to manipulate the value of the trustedkey, controlkey, or requestkey via a crafted packet, preventing authentication with ntpd until the daemon has been restarted. (CVE-2016-2517) - An out-of-bounds read error exists in the MATCH_ASSOC() function that occurs during the creation of peer associations with hmode greater than 7. An authenticated, remote attacker can exploit this, via a specially crafted packet, to cause a denial of service. (CVE-2016-2518) - An overflow condition exists in the ctl_getitem() function in ntpd due to improper validation of user-supplied input when reporting return values. An authenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to cause ntpd to abort. (CVE-2016-2519)
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2019-01-22
    plugin id 90923
    published 2016-05-05
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=90923
    title Network Time Protocol Daemon (ntpd) 3.x / 4.x < 4.2.8p7 Multiple Vulnerabilities
  • NASL family Fedora Local Security Checks
    NASL id FEDORA_2015-F5F5EC7B6B.NASL
    description Security fix for CVE-2015-7704, CVE-2015-5300, CVE-2015-7692, CVE-2015-7871, CVE-2015-7702, CVE-2015-7691, CVE-2015-7852, CVE-2015-7701 Note that Tenable Network Security has extracted the preceding description block directly from the Fedora security advisory. Tenable has attempted to automatically clean and format it as much as possible without introducing additional issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-01-30
    plugin id 89461
    published 2016-03-04
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=89461
    title Fedora 23 : ntp-4.2.6p5-34.fc23 (2015-f5f5ec7b6b)
  • NASL family Debian Local Security Checks
    NASL id DEBIAN_DLA-335.NASL
    description Several security issues where found in ntp : CVE-2015-5146 A flaw was found in the way ntpd processed certain remote configuration packets. An attacker could use a specially crafted package to cause ntpd to crash if : - ntpd enabled remote configuration - The attacker had the knowledge of the configuration password - The attacker had access to a computer entrusted to perform remote configuration Note that remote configuration is disabled by default in NTP. CVE-2015-5194 It was found that ntpd could crash due to an uninitialized variable when processing malformed logconfig configuration commands. CVE-2015-5195 It was found that ntpd exits with a segmentation fault when a statistics type that was not enabled during compilation (e.g. timingstats) is referenced by the statistics or filegen configuration command CVE-2015-5219 It was discovered that sntp program would hang in an infinite loop when a crafted NTP packet was received, related to the conversion of the precision value in the packet to double. CVE-2015-5300 It was found that ntpd did not correctly implement the -g option: Normally, ntpd exits with a message to the system log if the offset exceeds the panic threshold, which is 1000 s by default. This option allows the time to be set to any value without restriction; however, this can happen only once. If the threshold is exceeded after that, ntpd will exit with a message to the system log. This option can be used with the -q and -x options. ntpd could actually step the clock multiple times by more than the panic threshold if its clock discipline doesn't have enough time to reach the sync state and stay there for at least one update. If a man-in-the-middle attacker can control the NTP traffic since ntpd was started (or maybe up to 15-30 minutes after that), they can prevent the client from reaching the sync state and force it to step its clock by any amount any number of times, which can be used by attackers to expire certificates, etc. This is contrary to what the documentation says. Normally, the assumption is that an MITM attacker can step the clock more than the panic threshold only once when ntpd starts and to make a larger adjustment the attacker has to divide it into multiple smaller steps, each taking 15 minutes, which is slow. CVE-2015-7691, CVE-2015-7692, CVE-2015-7702 It was found that the fix for CVE-2014-9750 was incomplete: three issues were found in the value length checks in ntp_crypto.c, where a packet with particular autokey operations that contained malicious data was not always being completely validated. Receipt of these packets can cause ntpd to crash. CVE-2015-7701 A memory leak flaw was found in ntpd's CRYPTO_ASSOC. If ntpd is configured to use autokey authentication, an attacker could send packets to ntpd that would, after several days of ongoing attack, cause it to run out of memory. CVE-2015-7703 Miroslav Lichvár of Red Hat found that the :config command can be used to set the pidfile and driftfile paths without any restrictions. A remote attacker could use this flaw to overwrite a file on the file system with a file containing the pid of the ntpd process (immediately) or the current estimated drift of the system clock (in hourly intervals). For example: ntpq -c ':config pidfile /tmp/ntp.pid' ntpq -c ':config driftfile /tmp/ntp.drift' In Debian ntpd is configured to drop root privileges, which limits the impact of this issue. CVE-2015-7704 When ntpd as an NTP client receives a Kiss-of-Death (KoD) packet from the server to reduce its polling rate, it doesn't check if the originate timestamp in the reply matches the transmit timestamp from its request. An off-path attacker can send a crafted KoD packet to the client, which will increase the client's polling interval to a large value and effectively disable synchronization with the server. CVE-2015-7850 An exploitable denial of service vulnerability exists in the remote configuration functionality of the Network Time Protocol. A specially crafted configuration file could cause an endless loop resulting in a denial of service. An attacker could provide a the malicious configuration file to trigger this vulnerability. CVE-2015-7851 A potential path traversal vulnerability exists in the config file saving of ntpd on VMS. A specially crafted path could cause a path traversal potentially resulting in files being overwritten. An attacker could provide a malicious path to trigger this vulnerability. This issue does not affect Debian. CVE-2015-7852 A potential off by one vulnerability exists in the cookedprint functionality of ntpq. A specially crafted buffer could cause a buffer overflow potentially resulting in null byte being written out of bounds. CVE-2015-7855 It was found that NTP's decodenetnum() would abort with an assertion failure when processing a mode 6 or mode 7 packet containing an unusually long data value where a network address was expected. This could allow an authenticated attacker to crash ntpd. CVE-2015-7871 An error handling logic error exists within ntpd that manifests due to improper error condition handling associated with certain crypto-NAK packets. An unauthenticated, off­-path attacker can force ntpd processes on targeted servers to peer with time sources of the attacker's choosing by transmitting symmetric active crypto­-NAK packets to ntpd. This attack bypasses the authentication typically required to establish a peer association and allows an attacker to make arbitrary changes to system time. NOTE: Tenable Network Security has extracted the preceding description block directly from the DLA security advisory. Tenable has attempted to automatically clean and format it as much as possible without introducing additional issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-07-06
    plugin id 86640
    published 2015-10-29
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=86640
    title Debian DLA-335-1 : ntp security update
  • NASL family Red Hat Local Security Checks
    NASL id REDHAT-RHSA-2015-1930.NASL
    description Updated ntp packages that fix two security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security impact. Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base scores, which give detailed severity ratings, are available for each vulnerability from the CVE links in the References section. The Network Time Protocol (NTP) is used to synchronize a computer's time with a referenced time source. It was discovered that ntpd as a client did not correctly check timestamps in Kiss-of-Death packets. A remote attacker could use this flaw to send a crafted Kiss-of-Death packet to an ntpd client that would increase the client's polling interval value, and effectively disable synchronization with the server. (CVE-2015-7704) It was found that ntpd did not correctly implement the threshold limitation for the '-g' option, which is used to set the time without any restrictions. A man-in-the-middle attacker able to intercept NTP traffic between a connecting client and an NTP server could use this flaw to force that client to make multiple steps larger than the panic threshold, effectively changing the time to an arbitrary value. (CVE-2015-5300) Red Hat would like to thank Aanchal Malhotra, Isaac E. Cohen, and Sharon Goldberg of Boston University for reporting these issues. All ntp users are advised to upgrade to these updated packages, which contain backported patches to resolve these issues. After installing the update, the ntpd daemon will restart automatically.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-10
    plugin id 86614
    published 2015-10-27
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=86614
    title RHEL 6 / 7 : ntp (RHSA-2015:1930)
  • NASL family OracleVM Local Security Checks
    NASL id ORACLEVM_OVMSA-2016-0082.NASL
    description The remote OracleVM system is missing necessary patches to address critical security updates : - don't allow spoofed packets to demobilize associations (CVE-2015-7979, CVE-2016-1547) - don't allow spoofed packet to enable symmetric interleaved mode (CVE-2016-1548) - check mode of new source in config command (CVE-2016-2518) - make MAC check resilient against timing attack (CVE-2016-1550) - don't accept server/peer packets with zero origin timestamp (CVE-2015-8138) - fix crash with reslist command (CVE-2015-7977, CVE-2015-7978) - fix crash with invalid logconfig command (CVE-2015-5194) - fix crash when referencing disabled statistic type (CVE-2015-5195) - don't hang in sntp with crafted reply (CVE-2015-5219) - don't crash with crafted autokey packet (CVE-2015-7691, CVE-2015-7692, CVE-2015-7702) - fix memory leak with autokey (CVE-2015-7701) - don't allow setting driftfile and pidfile remotely (CVE-2015-7703) - don't crash in ntpq with crafted packet (CVE-2015-7852) - add option to set Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) (#1228314) - extend rawstats log (#1242895) - fix resetting of leap status (#1243034) - report clock state changes related to leap seconds (#1242937) - allow -4/-6 on restrict lines with mask (#1232146) - retry joining multicast groups (#1288534) - explain synchronised state in ntpstat man page (#1286969) - check origin timestamp before accepting KoD RATE packet (CVE-2015-7704) - allow only one step larger than panic threshold with -g (CVE-2015-5300)
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-07-24
    plugin id 91419
    published 2016-06-01
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=91419
    title OracleVM 3.3 / 3.4 : ntp (OVMSA-2016-0082)
  • NASL family Debian Local Security Checks
    NASL id DEBIAN_DSA-3388.NASL
    description Several vulnerabilities were discovered in the Network Time Protocol daemon and utility programs : - CVE-2015-5146 A flaw was found in the way ntpd processed certain remote configuration packets. An attacker could use a specially crafted package to cause ntpd to crash if : - ntpd enabled remote configuration - The attacker had the knowledge of the configuration password - The attacker had access to a computer entrusted to perform remote configuration Note that remote configuration is disabled by default in NTP. - CVE-2015-5194 It was found that ntpd could crash due to an uninitialized variable when processing malformed logconfig configuration commands. - CVE-2015-5195 It was found that ntpd exits with a segmentation fault when a statistics type that was not enabled during compilation (e.g. timingstats) is referenced by the statistics or filegen configuration command. - CVE-2015-5219 It was discovered that sntp program would hang in an infinite loop when a crafted NTP packet was received, related to the conversion of the precision value in the packet to double. - CVE-2015-5300 It was found that ntpd did not correctly implement the -g option : Normally, ntpd exits with a message to the system log if the offset exceeds the panic threshold, which is 1000 s by default. This option allows the time to be set to any value without restriction; however, this can happen only once. If the threshold is exceeded after that, ntpd will exit with a message to the system log. This option can be used with the -q and -x options. ntpd could actually step the clock multiple times by more than the panic threshold if its clock discipline doesn't have enough time to reach the sync state and stay there for at least one update. If a man-in-the-middle attacker can control the NTP traffic since ntpd was started (or maybe up to 15-30 minutes after that), they can prevent the client from reaching the sync state and force it to step its clock by any amount any number of times, which can be used by attackers to expire certificates, etc. This is contrary to what the documentation says. Normally, the assumption is that an MITM attacker can step the clock more than the panic threshold only once when ntpd starts and to make a larger adjustment the attacker has to divide it into multiple smaller steps, each taking 15 minutes, which is slow. - CVE-2015-7691, CVE-2015-7692, CVE-2015-7702 It was found that the fix for CVE-2014-9750 was incomplete: three issues were found in the value length checks in ntp_crypto.c, where a packet with particular autokey operations that contained malicious data was not always being completely validated. Receipt of these packets can cause ntpd to crash. - CVE-2015-7701 A memory leak flaw was found in ntpd's CRYPTO_ASSOC. If ntpd is configured to use autokey authentication, an attacker could send packets to ntpd that would, after several days of ongoing attack, cause it to run out of memory. - CVE-2015-7703 Miroslav Lichvar of Red Hat found that the :config command can be used to set the pidfile and driftfile paths without any restrictions. A remote attacker could use this flaw to overwrite a file on the file system with a file containing the pid of the ntpd process (immediately) or the current estimated drift of the system clock (in hourly intervals). For example : ntpq -c ':config pidfile /tmp/ntp.pid'ntpq -c ':config driftfile /tmp/ntp.drift' In Debian ntpd is configured to drop root privileges, which limits the impact of this issue. - CVE-2015-7704 If ntpd as an NTP client receives a Kiss-of-Death (KoD) packet from the server to reduce its polling rate, it doesn't check if the originate timestamp in the reply matches the transmit timestamp from its request. An off-path attacker can send a crafted KoD packet to the client, which will increase the client's polling interval to a large value and effectively disable synchronization with the server. - CVE-2015-7850 An exploitable denial of service vulnerability exists in the remote configuration functionality of the Network Time Protocol. A specially crafted configuration file could cause an endless loop resulting in a denial of service. An attacker could provide a malicious configuration file to trigger this vulnerability. - CVE-2015-7852 A potential off by one vulnerability exists in the cookedprint functionality of ntpq. A specially crafted buffer could cause a buffer overflow potentially resulting in null byte being written out of bounds. - CVE-2015-7855 It was found that NTP's decodenetnum() would abort with an assertion failure when processing a mode 6 or mode 7 packet containing an unusually long data value where a network address was expected. This could allow an authenticated attacker to crash ntpd. - CVE-2015-7871 An error handling logic error exists within ntpd that manifests due to improper error condition handling associated with certain crypto-NAK packets. An unauthenticated, off-path attacker can force ntpd processes on targeted servers to peer with time sources of the attacker's choosing by transmitting symmetric active crypto-NAK packets to ntpd. This attack bypasses the authentication typically required to establish a peer association and allows an attacker to make arbitrary changes to system time.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-10
    plugin id 86682
    published 2015-11-02
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=86682
    title Debian DSA-3388-1 : ntp - security update
  • NASL family SuSE Local Security Checks
    NASL id SUSE_SU-2015-2058-1.NASL
    description This ntp update provides the following security and non security fixes : - Update to 4.2.8p4 to fix several security issues (bsc#951608) : - CVE-2015-7871: NAK to the Future: Symmetric association authentication bypass via crypto-NAK - CVE-2015-7855: decodenetnum() will ASSERT botch instead of returning FAIL on some bogus values - CVE-2015-7854: Password Length Memory Corruption Vulnerability - CVE-2015-7853: Invalid length data provided by a custom refclock driver could cause a buffer overflow - CVE-2015-7852 ntpq atoascii() Memory Corruption Vulnerability - CVE-2015-7851 saveconfig Directory Traversal Vulnerability - CVE-2015-7850 remote config logfile-keyfile - CVE-2015-7849 trusted key use-after-free - CVE-2015-7848 mode 7 loop counter underrun - CVE-2015-7701 Slow memory leak in CRYPTO_ASSOC - CVE-2015-7703 configuration directives 'pidfile' and 'driftfile' should only be allowed locally - CVE-2015-7704, CVE-2015-7705 Clients that receive a KoD should validate the origin timestamp field - CVE-2015-7691, CVE-2015-7692, CVE-2015-7702 Incomplete autokey data packet length checks - Use ntpq instead of deprecated ntpdc in start-ntpd (bnc#936327). - Add a controlkey to ntp.conf to make the above work. - Improve runtime configuration : - Read keytype from ntp.conf - Don't write ntp keys to syslog. - Don't let 'keysdir' lines in ntp.conf trigger the 'keys' parser. - Fix the comment regarding addserver in ntp.conf (bnc#910063). - Remove ntp.1.gz, it wasn't installed anymore. - Remove ntp-4.2.7-rh-manpages.tar.gz and only keep ntptime.8.gz. The rest is partially irrelevant, partially redundant and potentially outdated (bsc#942587). - Remove 'kod' from the restrict line in ntp.conf (bsc#944300). - Use SHA1 instead of MD5 for symmetric keys (bsc#905885). - Require perl-Socket6 (bsc#942441). - Fix incomplete backporting of 'rcntp ntptimemset'. Note that Tenable Network Security has extracted the preceding description block directly from the SUSE security advisory. Tenable has attempted to automatically clean and format it as much as possible without introducing additional issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-29
    plugin id 87010
    published 2015-11-23
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=87010
    title SUSE SLED11 / SLES11 Security Update : ntp (SUSE-SU-2015:2058-1)
  • NASL family Misc.
    NASL id NTP_4_2_8P4.NASL
    description The version of the remote NTP server is 3.x or 4.x prior to 4.2.8p4. It is, therefore, affected by the following vulnerabilities : - A flaw exists in the ntp_crypto.c file due to improper validation of the 'vallen' value in extension fields. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this, via specially crafted autokey packets, to disclose sensitive information or cause a denial of service. (CVE-2015-7691) - A denial of service vulnerability exists in the autokey functionality due to a failure in the crypto_bob2(), crypto_bob3(), and cert_sign() functions to properly validate the 'vallen' value. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this, via specially crafted autokey packets, to crash the NTP service. (CVE-2015-7692) - A denial of service vulnerability exists in the crypto_recv() function in the file ntp_crypto.c related to autokey functionality. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this, via an ongoing flood of NTPv4 autokey requests, to exhaust memory resources. (CVE-2015-7701) - A denial of service vulnerability exists due to improper validation of packets containing certain autokey operations. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this, via specially crafted autokey packets, to crash the NTP service. (CVE-2015-7702) - A flaw exists related to the handling of the 'config:' command. An authenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to set the 'pidfile' and 'driftfile' directives without restrictions, thus allowing the attacker to overwrite arbitrary files. Note that exploitation of this issue requires that remote configuration is enabled for ntpd. (CVE-2015-7703) - A denial of service vulnerability exists due improper validation of the origin timestamp when handling Kiss-of-Death (KoD) packets. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to stop the client from querying its servers, preventing it from updating its clock. (CVE-2015-7704) - A denial of service vulnerability exists due to improper implementation of rate-limiting when handling server queries. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to stop the client from querying its servers, preventing it from updating its clock. (CVE-2015-7705) - A denial of service vulnerability exists due to an integer overflow condition in the reset_peer() function in the file ntp_request.c when handling private mode packets having request code RESET_PEER (0x16). An authenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to crash the NTP service. Note that exploitation of this issue requires that ntpd is configured to enable mode 7 packets, and that the mode 7 packets are not properly protected by available authentication and restriction mechanisms. (CVE-2015-7848) - A use-after-free error exists in the auth_delkeys() function in the file authkeys.c when handling trusted keys. An authenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to dereference already freed memory, resulting in a crash of the NTP service or the execution of arbitrary code. (CVE-2015-7849) - A denial of service vulnerability exists due to a logic flaw in the authreadkeys() function in the file authreadkeys.c when handling extended logging where the log and key files are set to be the same file. An authenticated, remote attacker can exploit this, via a crafted set of remote configuration requests, to cause the NTP service to stop responding. (CVE-2015-7850) - A flaw exists in the save_config() function in the file ntp_control.c due to improper sanitization of user-supplied input. An authenticated, remote attacker can exploit this issue, via a crafted set of configuration requests, to overwrite arbitrary files. Note that this issue only affects VMS systems and requires that ntpd is configured to allow remote configuration. (CVE-2015-7851) - A denial of service vulnerability exists due to an off-by-one overflow condition in the cookedprint() function in the file ntpq.c when handling mode 6 response packets. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to crash the NTP service. (CVE-2015-7852) - A overflow condition exists in the read_refclock_packet() function in the file ntp_io.c when handling negative data lengths. A local attacker can exploit this to crash the NTP service or possibly gain elevated privileges. (CVE-2015-7853) - A heap-based overflow condition exists in function MD5auth_setkey() in the file authkeys.c when handling passwords. An authenticated, remote attacker can exploit this, via a crafted set of configuration requests, to crash the NTP service or possibly execute arbitrary code. (CVE-2015-7854) - A denial of service vulnerability exists due to an assertion flaw in the decodenetnum() function in the file decodenetnum.c when handling long data values in mode 6 and 7 packets. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to crash the NTP service. (CVE-2015-7855) - An authentication bypass vulnerability exists in the receive() function in the file ntp_proto.c when handling crypto-NAK packets. An unauthenticated, remote attacker can exploit this to cause the service to accept time from unauthenticated, ephemeral symmetric peers. (CVE-2015-7871)
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2019-01-22
    plugin id 86631
    published 2015-10-28
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=86631
    title Network Time Protocol Daemon (ntpd) 3.x / 4.x < 4.2.8p4 Multiple Vulnerabilities
  • NASL family FreeBSD Local Security Checks
    NASL id FREEBSD_PKG_C4A18A1277FC11E5A687206A8A720317.NASL
    description ntp.org reports : NTF's NTP Project has been notified of the following 13 low- and medium-severity vulnerabilities that are fixed in ntp-4.2.8p4, released on Wednesday, 21 October 2015 : - Bug 2941 CVE-2015-7871 NAK to the Future: Symmetric association authentication bypass via crypto-NAK (Cisco ASIG) - Bug 2922 CVE-2015-7855 decodenetnum() will ASSERT botch instead of returning FAIL on some bogus values (IDA) - Bug 2921 CVE-2015-7854 Password Length Memory Corruption Vulnerability. (Cisco TALOS) - Bug 2920 CVE-2015-7853 Invalid length data provided by a custom refclock driver could cause a buffer overflow. (Cisco TALOS) - Bug 2919 CVE-2015-7852 ntpq atoascii() Memory Corruption Vulnerability. (Cisco TALOS) - Bug 2918 CVE-2015-7851 saveconfig Directory Traversal Vulnerability. (OpenVMS) (Cisco TALOS) - Bug 2917 CVE-2015-7850 remote config logfile-keyfile. (Cisco TALOS) - Bug 2916 CVE-2015-7849 trusted key use-after-free. (Cisco TALOS) - Bug 2913 CVE-2015-7848 mode 7 loop counter underrun. (Cisco TALOS) - Bug 2909 CVE-2015-7701 Slow memory leak in CRYPTO_ASSOC. (Tenable) - Bug 2902 : CVE-2015-7703 configuration directives 'pidfile' and 'driftfile' should only be allowed locally. (RedHat) - Bug 2901 : CVE-2015-7704, CVE-2015-7705 Clients that receive a KoD should validate the origin timestamp field. (Boston University) - Bug 2899 : CVE-2015-7691, CVE-2015-7692, CVE-2015-7702 Incomplete autokey data packet length checks. (Tenable) The only generally-exploitable bug in the above list is the crypto-NAK bug, which has a CVSS2 score of 6.4. Additionally, three bugs that have already been fixed in ntp-4.2.8 but were not fixed in ntp-4.2.6 as it was EOL'd have a security component, but are all below 1.8 CVSS score, so we're reporting them here : - Bug 2382 : Peer precision < -31 gives division by zero - Bug 1774 : Segfaults if cryptostats enabled when built without OpenSSL - Bug 1593 : ntpd abort in free() with logconfig syntax error
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-10
    plugin id 86519
    published 2015-10-22
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=86519
    title FreeBSD : ntp -- 13 low- and medium-severity vulnerabilities (c4a18a12-77fc-11e5-a687-206a8a720317)
  • NASL family Oracle Linux Local Security Checks
    NASL id ORACLELINUX_ELSA-2015-1930.NASL
    description From Red Hat Security Advisory 2015:1930 : Updated ntp packages that fix two security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security impact. Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base scores, which give detailed severity ratings, are available for each vulnerability from the CVE links in the References section. The Network Time Protocol (NTP) is used to synchronize a computer's time with a referenced time source. It was discovered that ntpd as a client did not correctly check timestamps in Kiss-of-Death packets. A remote attacker could use this flaw to send a crafted Kiss-of-Death packet to an ntpd client that would increase the client's polling interval value, and effectively disable synchronization with the server. (CVE-2015-7704) It was found that ntpd did not correctly implement the threshold limitation for the '-g' option, which is used to set the time without any restrictions. A man-in-the-middle attacker able to intercept NTP traffic between a connecting client and an NTP server could use this flaw to force that client to make multiple steps larger than the panic threshold, effectively changing the time to an arbitrary value. (CVE-2015-5300) Red Hat would like to thank Aanchal Malhotra, Isaac E. Cohen, and Sharon Goldberg of Boston University for reporting these issues. All ntp users are advised to upgrade to these updated packages, which contain backported patches to resolve these issues. After installing the update, the ntpd daemon will restart automatically.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-07-24
    plugin id 86612
    published 2015-10-27
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=86612
    title Oracle Linux 6 / 7 : ntp (ELSA-2015-1930)
  • NASL family Slackware Local Security Checks
    NASL id SLACKWARE_SSA_2016-120-01.NASL
    description New ntp packages are available for Slackware 13.0, 13.1, 13.37, 14.0, 14.1, and -current to fix security issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-09-06
    plugin id 90800
    published 2016-05-02
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=90800
    title Slackware 13.0 / 13.1 / 13.37 / 14.0 / 14.1 / current : ntp (SSA:2016-120-01)
  • NASL family Scientific Linux Local Security Checks
    NASL id SL_20151026_NTP_ON_SL6_X.NASL
    description It was discovered that ntpd as a client did not correctly check timestamps in Kiss-of-Death packets. A remote attacker could use this flaw to send a crafted Kiss-of-Death packet to an ntpd client that would increase the client's polling interval value, and effectively disable synchronization with the server. (CVE-2015-7704) It was found that ntpd did not correctly implement the threshold limitation for the '-g' option, which is used to set the time without any restrictions. A man-in-the-middle attacker able to intercept NTP traffic between a connecting client and an NTP server could use this flaw to force that client to make multiple steps larger than the panic threshold, effectively changing the time to an arbitrary value. (CVE-2015-5300) After installing the update, the ntpd daemon will restart automatically.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-12-28
    plugin id 86615
    published 2015-10-27
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=86615
    title Scientific Linux Security Update : ntp on SL6.x, SL7.x i386/x86_64
  • NASL family Fedora Local Security Checks
    NASL id FEDORA_2016-34BC10A2C8.NASL
    description Security fix for CVE-2015-7974, CVE-2015-8138, CVE-2015-7977, CVE-2015-7978, CVE-2015-7979, CVE-2015-8158 ---- Security fix for CVE-2015-7704, CVE-2015-5300, CVE-2015-7692, CVE-2015-7871, CVE-2015-7702, CVE-2015-7691, CVE-2015-7852, CVE-2015-7701 Note that Tenable Network Security has extracted the preceding description block directly from the Fedora security advisory. Tenable has attempted to automatically clean and format it as much as possible without introducing additional issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-02-01
    plugin id 89510
    published 2016-03-04
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=89510
    title Fedora 22 : ntp-4.2.6p5-36.fc22 (2016-34bc10a2c8)
  • NASL family Amazon Linux Local Security Checks
    NASL id ALA_ALAS-2015-607.NASL
    description It was discovered that ntpd as a client did not correctly check timestamps in Kiss-of-Death packets. A remote attacker could use this flaw to send a crafted Kiss-of-Death packet to an ntpd client that would increase the client's polling interval value, and effectively disable synchronization with the server. (CVE-2015-7704) It was found that ntpd did not correctly implement the threshold limitation for the '-g' option, which is used to set the time without any restrictions. A man-in-the-middle attacker able to intercept NTP traffic between a connecting client and an NTP server could use this flaw to force that client to make multiple steps larger than the panic threshold, effectively changing the time to an arbitrary value. (CVE-2015-5300) It was found that the fix for CVE-2014-9750 was incomplete: three issues were found in the value length checks in ntp_crypto.c, where a packet with particular autokey operations that contained malicious data was not always being completely validated. Receipt of these packets can cause ntpd to crash. (CVE-2015-7691 , CVE-2015-7692 , CVE-2015-7702) A potential off by one vulnerability exists in the cookedprint functionality of ntpq. A specially crafted buffer could cause a buffer overflow potentially resulting in null byte being written out of bounds. (CVE-2015-7852) A memory leak flaw was found in ntpd's CRYPTO_ASSOC. If ntpd is configured to use autokey authentication, an attacker could send packets to ntpd that would, after several days of ongoing attack, cause it to run out of memory. (CVE-2015-7701)
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-04-18
    plugin id 86638
    published 2015-10-29
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=86638
    title Amazon Linux AMI : ntp (ALAS-2015-607)
  • NASL family SuSE Local Security Checks
    NASL id OPENSUSE-2016-599.NASL
    description This update for ntp to 4.2.8p7 fixes the following issues : - CVE-2016-1547, bsc#977459: Validate crypto-NAKs, AKA: CRYPTO-NAK DoS. - CVE-2016-1548, bsc#977461: Interleave-pivot - CVE-2016-1549, bsc#977451: Sybil vulnerability: ephemeral association attack. - CVE-2016-1550, bsc#977464: Improve NTP security against buffer comparison timing attacks. - CVE-2016-1551, bsc#977450: Refclock impersonation vulnerability - CVE-2016-2516, bsc#977452: Duplicate IPs on unconfig directives will cause an assertion botch in ntpd. - CVE-2016-2517, bsc#977455: remote configuration trustedkey/ requestkey/controlkey values are not properly validated. - CVE-2016-2518, bsc#977457: Crafted addpeer with hmode > 7 causes array wraparound with MATCH_ASSOC. - CVE-2016-2519, bsc#977458: ctl_getitem() return value not always checked. - This update also improves the fixes for: CVE-2015-7704, CVE-2015-7705, CVE-2015-7974 Bugs fixed : - Restrict the parser in the startup script to the first occurrance of 'keys' and 'controlkey' in ntp.conf (bsc#957226). This update was imported from the SUSE:SLE-12-SP1:Update update project.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-09-06
    plugin id 91269
    published 2016-05-20
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=91269
    title openSUSE Security Update : ntp (openSUSE-2016-599)
  • NASL family SuSE Local Security Checks
    NASL id SUSE_SU-2016-1278-1.NASL
    description This update for ntp to 4.2.8p7 fixes the following issues : - CVE-2016-1547, bsc#977459: Validate crypto-NAKs, AKA: CRYPTO-NAK DoS. - CVE-2016-1548, bsc#977461: Interleave-pivot - CVE-2016-1549, bsc#977451: Sybil vulnerability: ephemeral association attack. - CVE-2016-1550, bsc#977464: Improve NTP security against buffer comparison timing attacks. - CVE-2016-1551, bsc#977450: Refclock impersonation vulnerability - CVE-2016-2516, bsc#977452: Duplicate IPs on unconfig directives will cause an assertion botch in ntpd. - CVE-2016-2517, bsc#977455: remote configuration trustedkey/ requestkey/controlkey values are not properly validated. - CVE-2016-2518, bsc#977457: Crafted addpeer with hmode > 7 causes array wraparound with MATCH_ASSOC. - CVE-2016-2519, bsc#977458: ctl_getitem() return value not always checked. - This update also improves the fixes for: CVE-2015-7704, CVE-2015-7705, CVE-2015-7974 Bugs fixed : - Restrict the parser in the startup script to the first occurrance of 'keys' and 'controlkey' in ntp.conf (bsc#957226). Note that Tenable Network Security has extracted the preceding description block directly from the SUSE security advisory. Tenable has attempted to automatically clean and format it as much as possible without introducing additional issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-29
    plugin id 91120
    published 2016-05-13
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=91120
    title SUSE SLES11 Security Update : ntp (SUSE-SU-2016:1278-1)
  • NASL family SuSE Local Security Checks
    NASL id SUSE_SU-2016-1291-1.NASL
    description This update for ntp to 4.2.8p7 fixes the following issues : - CVE-2016-1547, bsc#977459: Validate crypto-NAKs, AKA: CRYPTO-NAK DoS. - CVE-2016-1548, bsc#977461: Interleave-pivot - CVE-2016-1549, bsc#977451: Sybil vulnerability: ephemeral association attack. - CVE-2016-1550, bsc#977464: Improve NTP security against buffer comparison timing attacks. - CVE-2016-1551, bsc#977450: Refclock impersonation vulnerability - CVE-2016-2516, bsc#977452: Duplicate IPs on unconfig directives will cause an assertion botch in ntpd. - CVE-2016-2517, bsc#977455: remote configuration trustedkey/ requestkey/controlkey values are not properly validated. - CVE-2016-2518, bsc#977457: Crafted addpeer with hmode > 7 causes array wraparound with MATCH_ASSOC. - CVE-2016-2519, bsc#977458: ctl_getitem() return value not always checked. - This update also improves the fixes for: CVE-2015-7704, CVE-2015-7705, CVE-2015-7974 Bugs fixed : - Restrict the parser in the startup script to the first occurrance of 'keys' and 'controlkey' in ntp.conf (bsc#957226). Note that Tenable Network Security has extracted the preceding description block directly from the SUSE security advisory. Tenable has attempted to automatically clean and format it as much as possible without introducing additional issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-29
    plugin id 91159
    published 2016-05-16
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=91159
    title SUSE SLED12 / SLES12 Security Update : ntp (SUSE-SU-2016:1291-1)
  • NASL family SuSE Local Security Checks
    NASL id OPENSUSE-2015-767.NASL
    description This ntp update provides the following security and non security fixes : - Update to 4.2.8p4 to fix several security issues (bsc#951608) : - CVE-2015-7871: NAK to the Future: Symmetric association authentication bypass via crypto-NAK - CVE-2015-7855: decodenetnum() will ASSERT botch instead of returning FAIL on some bogus values - CVE-2015-7854: Password Length Memory Corruption Vulnerability - CVE-2015-7853: Invalid length data provided by a custom refclock driver could cause a buffer overflow - CVE-2015-7852 ntpq atoascii() Memory Corruption Vulnerability - CVE-2015-7851 saveconfig Directory Traversal Vulnerability - CVE-2015-7850 remote config logfile-keyfile - CVE-2015-7849 trusted key use-after-free - CVE-2015-7848 mode 7 loop counter underrun - CVE-2015-7701 Slow memory leak in CRYPTO_ASSOC - CVE-2015-7703 configuration directives 'pidfile' and 'driftfile' should only be allowed locally - CVE-2015-7704, CVE-2015-7705 Clients that receive a KoD should validate the origin timestamp field - CVE-2015-7691, CVE-2015-7692, CVE-2015-7702 Incomplete autokey data packet length checks - obsoletes ntp-memlock.patch. - Add a controlkey line to /etc/ntp.conf if one does not already exist to allow runtime configuuration via ntpq.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-01-26
    plugin id 86964
    published 2015-11-20
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=86964
    title openSUSE Security Update : ntp (openSUSE-2015-767)
  • NASL family CentOS Local Security Checks
    NASL id CENTOS_RHSA-2015-1930.NASL
    description Updated ntp packages that fix two security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security impact. Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base scores, which give detailed severity ratings, are available for each vulnerability from the CVE links in the References section. The Network Time Protocol (NTP) is used to synchronize a computer's time with a referenced time source. It was discovered that ntpd as a client did not correctly check timestamps in Kiss-of-Death packets. A remote attacker could use this flaw to send a crafted Kiss-of-Death packet to an ntpd client that would increase the client's polling interval value, and effectively disable synchronization with the server. (CVE-2015-7704) It was found that ntpd did not correctly implement the threshold limitation for the '-g' option, which is used to set the time without any restrictions. A man-in-the-middle attacker able to intercept NTP traffic between a connecting client and an NTP server could use this flaw to force that client to make multiple steps larger than the panic threshold, effectively changing the time to an arbitrary value. (CVE-2015-5300) Red Hat would like to thank Aanchal Malhotra, Isaac E. Cohen, and Sharon Goldberg of Boston University for reporting these issues. All ntp users are advised to upgrade to these updated packages, which contain backported patches to resolve these issues. After installing the update, the ntpd daemon will restart automatically.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-10
    plugin id 86611
    published 2015-10-27
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=86611
    title CentOS 6 / 7 : ntp (CESA-2015:1930)
  • NASL family Fedora Local Security Checks
    NASL id FEDORA_2015-77BFBC1BCD.NASL
    description Security fix for CVE-2015-7704, CVE-2015-5300, CVE-2015-7692, CVE-2015-7871, CVE-2015-7702, CVE-2015-7691, CVE-2015-7852, CVE-2015-7701 ---- Security fix for CVE-2015-5146, CVE-2015-5194, CVE-2015-5219, CVE-2015-5195, CVE-2015-5196 Note that Tenable Network Security has extracted the preceding description block directly from the Fedora security advisory. Tenable has attempted to automatically clean and format it as much as possible without introducing additional issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-01-30
    plugin id 89288
    published 2016-03-04
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=89288
    title Fedora 21 : ntp-4.2.6p5-34.fc21 (2015-77bfbc1bcd)
  • NASL family Firewalls
    NASL id PFSENSE_SA-15_08.NASL
    description According to its self-reported version number, the remote pfSense install is prior to 2.2.5. It is, therefore, affected by multiple vulnerabilities as stated in the referenced vendor advisories.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-07-24
    plugin id 106497
    published 2018-01-31
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=106497
    title pfSense < 2.2.5 Multiple Vulnerabilities (SA-15_08)
  • NASL family Red Hat Local Security Checks
    NASL id REDHAT-RHSA-2015-2520.NASL
    description Updated ntp packages that fix one security issue are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.5 and 6.6 Extended Update Support. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security impact. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which gives a detailed severity rating, is available from the CVE link in the References section. The Network Time Protocol (NTP) is used to synchronize a computer's time with a referenced time source. It was discovered that ntpd as a client did not correctly check timestamps in Kiss-of-Death packets. A remote attacker could use this flaw to send a crafted Kiss-of-Death packet to an ntpd client that would increase the client's polling interval value, and effectively disable synchronization with the server. (CVE-2015-7704) Red Hat would like to thank Aanchal Malhotra, Isaac E. Cohen, and Sharon Goldberg of Boston University for reporting this issue. All ntp users are advised to upgrade to these updated packages, which contain a backported patch to resolve this issue. After installing the update, the ntpd daemon will restart automatically.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-10
    plugin id 87101
    published 2015-11-30
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=87101
    title RHEL 6 : ntp (RHSA-2015:2520)
  • NASL family F5 Networks Local Security Checks
    NASL id F5_BIGIP_SOL17566.NASL
    description The ntpd client in NTP 4.x before 4.2.8p4 and 4.3.x before 4.3.77 allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service via a number of crafted 'KOD' messages. (CVE-2015-7704) Impact An off-path attacker can send a crafted Kiss of Death (KoD) packet to the client, which will increase the client's polling interval to a large value and effectively disable synchronization with the server.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2019-01-04
    plugin id 86774
    published 2015-11-06
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=86774
    title F5 Networks BIG-IP : NTP vulnerability (K17566)
  • NASL family SuSE Local Security Checks
    NASL id SUSE_SU-2016-1912-1.NASL
    description NTP was updated to version 4.2.8p8 to fix several security issues and to ensure the continued maintainability of the package. These security issues were fixed : CVE-2016-4953: Bad authentication demobilized ephemeral associations (bsc#982065). CVE-2016-4954: Processing spoofed server packets (bsc#982066). CVE-2016-4955: Autokey association reset (bsc#982067). CVE-2016-4956: Broadcast interleave (bsc#982068). CVE-2016-4957: CRYPTO_NAK crash (bsc#982064). CVE-2016-1547: Validate crypto-NAKs to prevent ACRYPTO-NAK DoS (bsc#977459). CVE-2016-1548: Prevent the change of time of an ntpd client or denying service to an ntpd client by forcing it to change from basic client/server mode to interleaved symmetric mode (bsc#977461). CVE-2016-1549: Sybil vulnerability: ephemeral association attack (bsc#977451). CVE-2016-1550: Improve security against buffer comparison timing attacks (bsc#977464). CVE-2016-1551: Refclock impersonation vulnerability (bsc#977450)y CVE-2016-2516: Duplicate IPs on unconfig directives could have caused an assertion botch in ntpd (bsc#977452). CVE-2016-2517: Remote configuration trustedkey/ requestkey/controlkey values are not properly validated (bsc#977455). CVE-2016-2518: Crafted addpeer with hmode > 7 causes array wraparound with MATCH_ASSOC (bsc#977457). CVE-2016-2519: ctl_getitem() return value not always checked (bsc#977458). CVE-2015-8158: Potential Infinite Loop in ntpq (bsc#962966). CVE-2015-8138: Zero Origin Timestamp Bypass (bsc#963002). CVE-2015-7979: Off-path Denial of Service (DoS) attack on authenticated broadcast mode (bsc#962784). CVE-2015-7978: Stack exhaustion in recursive traversal of restriction list (bsc#963000). CVE-2015-7977: reslist NULL pointer dereference (bsc#962970). CVE-2015-7976: ntpq saveconfig command allowed dangerous characters in filenames (bsc#962802). CVE-2015-7975: nextvar() missing length check (bsc#962988). CVE-2015-7974: NTP did not verify peer associations of symmetric keys when authenticating packets, which might have allowed remote attackers to conduct impersonation attacks via an arbitrary trusted key, aka a 'skeleton' key (bsc#962960). CVE-2015-7973: Replay attack on authenticated broadcast mode (bsc#962995). CVE-2015-5300: MITM attacker can force ntpd to make a step larger than the panic threshold (bsc#951629). CVE-2015-5194: Crash with crafted logconfig configuration command (bsc#943218). CVE-2015-7871: NAK to the Future: Symmetric association authentication bypass via crypto-NAK (bsc#952611). CVE-2015-7855: decodenetnum() will ASSERT botch instead of returning FAIL on some bogus values (bsc#952611). CVE-2015-7854: Password Length Memory Corruption Vulnerability (bsc#952611). CVE-2015-7853: Invalid length data provided by a custom refclock driver could cause a buffer overflow (bsc#952611). CVE-2015-7852: ntpq atoascii() Memory Corruption Vulnerability (bsc#952611). CVE-2015-7851: saveconfig Directory Traversal Vulnerability (bsc#952611). CVE-2015-7850: Clients that receive a KoD now validate the origin timestamp field (bsc#952611). CVE-2015-7849: Prevent use-after-free trusted key (bsc#952611). CVE-2015-7848: Prevent mode 7 loop counter underrun (bsc#952611). CVE-2015-7701: Slow memory leak in CRYPTO_ASSOC (bsc#952611). CVE-2015-7703: Configuration directives 'pidfile' and 'driftfile' should only be allowed locally (bsc#943221). CVE-2015-7704: Clients that receive a KoD should validate the origin timestamp field (bsc#952611). CVE-2015-7705: Clients that receive a KoD should validate the origin timestamp field (bsc#952611). CVE-2015-7691: Incomplete autokey data packet length checks (bsc#952611). CVE-2015-7692: Incomplete autokey data packet length checks (bsc#952611). CVE-2015-7702: Incomplete autokey data packet length checks (bsc#952611). CVE-2015-1798: The symmetric-key feature in the receive function in ntp_proto.c in ntpd in NTP required a correct MAC only if the MAC field has a nonzero length, which made it easier for man-in-the-middle attackers to spoof packets by omitting the MAC (bsc#924202). CVE-2015-1799: The symmetric-key feature in the receive function in ntp_proto.c in ntpd in NTP performed state-variable updates upon receiving certain invalid packets, which made it easier for man-in-the-middle attackers to cause a denial of service (synchronization loss) by spoofing the source IP address of a peer (bsc#924202). The update package also includes non-security fixes. See advisory for details. Note that Tenable Network Security has extracted the preceding description block directly from the SUSE security advisory. Tenable has attempted to automatically clean and format it as much as possible without introducing additional issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-29
    plugin id 93186
    published 2016-08-29
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=93186
    title SUSE SLES10 Security Update : ntp (SUSE-SU-2016:1912-1)
  • NASL family FreeBSD Local Security Checks
    NASL id FREEBSD_PKG_B2487D9A0C3011E6ACD0D050996490D0.NASL
    description Network Time Foundation reports : NTF's NTP Project has been notified of the following low- and medium-severity vulnerabilities that are fixed in ntp-4.2.8p7, released on Tuesday, 26 April 2016 : - Bug 3020 / CVE-2016-1551: Refclock impersonation vulnerability, AKA: refclock-peering. Reported by Matt Street and others of Cisco ASIG - Bug 3012 / CVE-2016-1549: Sybil vulnerability : ephemeral association attack, AKA: ntp-sybil - MITIGATION ONLY. Reported by Matthew Van Gundy of Cisco ASIG - Bug 3011 / CVE-2016-2516: Duplicate IPs on unconfig directives will cause an assertion botch. Reported by Yihan Lian of the Cloud Security Team, Qihoo 360 - Bug 3010 / CVE-2016-2517: Remote configuration trustedkey/requestkey values are not properly validated. Reported by Yihan Lian of the Cloud Security Team, Qihoo 360 - Bug 3009 / CVE-2016-2518: Crafted addpeer with hmode > 7 causes array wraparound with MATCH_ASSOC. Reported by Yihan Lian of the Cloud Security Team, Qihoo 360 - Bug 3008 / CVE-2016-2519: ctl_getitem() return value not always checked. Reported by Yihan Lian of the Cloud Security Team, Qihoo 360 - Bug 3007 / CVE-2016-1547: Validate crypto-NAKs, AKA: nak-dos. Reported by Stephen Gray and Matthew Van Gundy of Cisco ASIG - Bug 2978 / CVE-2016-1548: Interleave-pivot - MITIGATION ONLY. Reported by Miroslav Lichvar of RedHat and separately by Jonathan Gardner of Cisco ASIG. - Bug 2952 / CVE-2015-7704: KoD fix: peer associations were broken by the fix for NtpBug2901, AKA: Symmetric active/passive mode is broken. Reported by Michael Tatarinov, NTP Project Developer Volunteer - Bug 2945 / Bug 2901 / CVE-2015-8138: Zero Origin Timestamp Bypass, AKA: Additional KoD Checks. Reported by Jonathan Gardner of Cisco ASIG - Bug 2879 / CVE-2016-1550: Improve NTP security against buffer comparison timing attacks, authdecrypt-timing, AKA: authdecrypt-timing. Reported independently by Loganaden Velvindron, and Matthew Van Gundy and Stephen Gray of Cisco ASIG.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-10
    plugin id 90742
    published 2016-04-27
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=90742
    title FreeBSD : ntp -- multiple vulnerabilities (b2487d9a-0c30-11e6-acd0-d050996490d0)
  • NASL family Slackware Local Security Checks
    NASL id SLACKWARE_SSA_2015-302-03.NASL
    description New ntp packages are available for Slackware 13.0, 13.1, 13.37, 14.0, 14.1, and -current to fix security issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-01-26
    plugin id 86664
    published 2015-10-30
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=86664
    title Slackware 13.0 / 13.1 / 13.37 / 14.0 / 14.1 / current : ntp (SSA:2015-302-03)
redhat via4
advisories
  • bugzilla
    id 1271076
    title CVE-2015-5300 ntp: MITM attacker can force ntpd to make a step larger than the panic threshold
    oval
    OR
    • AND
      • OR
        • comment Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Client is installed
          oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20100842001
        • comment Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Server is installed
          oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20100842002
        • comment Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Workstation is installed
          oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20100842003
        • comment Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 ComputeNode is installed
          oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20100842004
      • OR
        • AND
          • comment ntp is earlier than 0:4.2.6p5-5.el6_7.2
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20151930009
          • comment ntp is signed with Red Hat redhatrelease2 key
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20142024006
        • AND
          • comment ntp-doc is earlier than 0:4.2.6p5-5.el6_7.2
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20151930011
          • comment ntp-doc is signed with Red Hat redhatrelease2 key
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20142024010
        • AND
          • comment ntp-perl is earlier than 0:4.2.6p5-5.el6_7.2
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20151930005
          • comment ntp-perl is signed with Red Hat redhatrelease2 key
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20142024014
        • AND
          • comment ntpdate is earlier than 0:4.2.6p5-5.el6_7.2
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20151930007
          • comment ntpdate is signed with Red Hat redhatrelease2 key
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20142024012
    • AND
      • OR
        • comment Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Client is installed
          oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20140675001
        • comment Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Server is installed
          oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20140675002
        • comment Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Workstation is installed
          oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20140675003
        • comment Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 ComputeNode is installed
          oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20140675004
      • OR
        • AND
          • comment ntp is earlier than 0:4.2.6p5-19.el7_1.3
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20151930020
          • comment ntp is signed with Red Hat redhatrelease2 key
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20142024006
        • AND
          • comment ntp-doc is earlier than 0:4.2.6p5-19.el7_1.3
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20151930021
          • comment ntp-doc is signed with Red Hat redhatrelease2 key
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20142024010
        • AND
          • comment ntp-perl is earlier than 0:4.2.6p5-19.el7_1.3
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20151930022
          • comment ntp-perl is signed with Red Hat redhatrelease2 key
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20142024014
        • AND
          • comment ntpdate is earlier than 0:4.2.6p5-19.el7_1.3
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20151930019
          • comment ntpdate is signed with Red Hat redhatrelease2 key
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20142024012
        • AND
          • comment sntp is earlier than 0:4.2.6p5-19.el7_1.3
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20151930017
          • comment sntp is signed with Red Hat redhatrelease2 key
            oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20142024008
    rhsa
    id RHSA-2015:1930
    released 2015-10-26
    severity Important
    title RHSA-2015:1930: ntp security update (Important)
  • rhsa
    id RHSA-2015:2520
rpms
  • ntp-0:4.2.6p5-5.el6_7.2
  • ntp-doc-0:4.2.6p5-5.el6_7.2
  • ntp-perl-0:4.2.6p5-5.el6_7.2
  • ntpdate-0:4.2.6p5-5.el6_7.2
  • ntp-0:4.2.6p5-19.el7_1.3
  • ntp-doc-0:4.2.6p5-19.el7_1.3
  • ntp-perl-0:4.2.6p5-19.el7_1.3
  • ntpdate-0:4.2.6p5-19.el7_1.3
  • sntp-0:4.2.6p5-19.el7_1.3
refmap via4
bid 77280
cert-vn VU#718152
confirm
debian DSA-3388
gentoo GLSA-201607-15
misc
sectrack 1033951
Last major update 07-08-2017 - 16:29
Published 07-08-2017 - 16:29
Last modified 17-05-2018 - 21:29
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