ID CVE-2021-1399
Summary A vulnerability in the Self Care Portal of Cisco Unified Communications Manager (Unified CM) and Cisco Unified Communications Manager Session Management Edition (Unified CM SME) could allow an authenticated, remote attacker to modify data on an affected system without proper authorization. The vulnerability is due to insufficient validation of user-supplied data to the Self Care Portal. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by sending a crafted HTTP request to an affected system. A successful exploit could allow the attacker to modify information without proper authorization.
References
Vulnerable Configurations
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\):*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\):*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su1:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su1:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su2:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su2:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su2a:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su2a:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su3:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su3:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su3a:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su3a:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su4:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su4:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su4a:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su4a:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su6:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su6:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su6a:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su6a:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su7:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su7:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su8:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su8:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su9:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su9:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su10:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su10:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:11.5\(1\):*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:11.5\(1\):*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:11.5\(1\)su8:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:11.5\(1\)su8:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:11.5\(1\)su9:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:11.5\(1\)su9:*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:12.0\(1\):*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:12.0\(1\):*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:12.5\(1\):*:*:*:-:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:12.5\(1\):*:*:*:-:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\):*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\):*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su1:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su1:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su2:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su2:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su2a:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su2a:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su3:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su3:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su3a:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su3a:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su4:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su4:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su4a:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su4a:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su6:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su6:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su6a:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su6a:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su7:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su7:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su8:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su8:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su9:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su9:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su10:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:10.5\(2\)su10:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:11.5\(1\):*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:11.5\(1\):*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:11.5\(1\)su8:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:11.5\(1\)su8:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:11.5\(1\)su9:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:11.5\(1\)su9:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:12.0\(1\):*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:12.0\(1\):*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:12.5:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:12.5:*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
  • cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:12.5\(1\):*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
    cpe:2.3:a:cisco:unified_communications_manager:12.5\(1\):*:*:*:session_management:*:*:*
CVSS
Base: 4.0 (as of 13-04-2021 - 17:49)
Impact:
Exploitability:
CWE CWE-302
CAPEC
  • HTTP Verb Tampering
    An attacker modifies the HTTP Verb (e.g. GET, PUT, TRACE, etc.) in order to bypass access restrictions. Some web environments allow administrators to restrict access based on the HTTP Verb used with requests. However, attackers can often provide a different HTTP Verb, or even provide a random string as a verb in order to bypass these protections. This allows the attacker to access data that should otherwise be protected.
  • Manipulating Opaque Client-based Data Tokens
    In circumstances where an application holds important data client-side in tokens (cookies, URLs, data files, and so forth) that data can be manipulated. If client or server-side application components reinterpret that data as authentication tokens or data (such as store item pricing or wallet information) then even opaquely manipulating that data may bear fruit for an Attacker. In this pattern an attacker undermines the assumption that client side tokens have been adequately protected from tampering through use of encryption or obfuscation.
  • Buffer Overflow via Environment Variables
    This attack pattern involves causing a buffer overflow through manipulation of environment variables. Once the attacker finds that they can modify an environment variable, they may try to overflow associated buffers. This attack leverages implicit trust often placed in environment variables.
  • Exploitation of Trusted Credentials
    Attacks on session IDs and resource IDs take advantage of the fact that some software accepts user input without verifying its authenticity. For example, a message queuing system that allows service requesters to post messages to its queue through an open channel (such as anonymous FTP), authorization is done through checking group or role membership contained in the posted message. However, there is no proof that the message itself, the information in the message (such group or role membership), or indeed the process that wrote the message to the queue are authentic and authorized to do so. Many server side processes are vulnerable to these attacks because the server to server communications have not been analyzed from a security perspective or the processes "trust" other systems because they are behind a firewall. In a similar way servers that use easy to guess or spoofable schemes for representing digital identity can also be vulnerable. Such systems frequently use schemes without cryptography and digital signatures (or with broken cryptography). Session IDs may be guessed due to insufficient randomness, poor protection (passed in the clear), lack of integrity (unsigned), or improperly correlation with access control policy enforcement points. Exposed configuration and properties files that contain system passwords, database connection strings, and such may also give an attacker an edge to identify these identifiers. The net result is that spoofing and impersonation is possible leading to an attacker's ability to break authentication, authorization, and audit controls on the system.
  • Accessing/Intercepting/Modifying HTTP Cookies
    This attack relies on the use of HTTP Cookies to store credentials, state information and other critical data on client systems. There are several different forms of this attack. The first form of this attack involves accessing HTTP Cookies to mine for potentially sensitive data contained therein. The second form involves intercepting this data as it is transmitted from client to server. This intercepted information is then used by the adversary to impersonate the remote user/session. The third form is when the cookie's content is modified by the adversary before it is sent back to the server. Here the adversary seeks to convince the target server to operate on this falsified information.
  • Buffer Overflow via Symbolic Links
    This type of attack leverages the use of symbolic links to cause buffer overflows. An attacker can try to create or manipulate a symbolic link file such that its contents result in out of bounds data. When the target software processes the symbolic link file, it could potentially overflow internal buffers with insufficient bounds checking.
  • Subverting Environment Variable Values
    The attacker directly or indirectly modifies environment variables used by or controlling the target software. The attacker's goal is to cause the target software to deviate from its expected operation in a manner that benefits the attacker.
  • Manipulating User-Controlled Variables
    This attack targets user controlled variables (DEBUG=1, PHP Globals, and So Forth). An attacker can override environment variables leveraging user-supplied, untrusted query variables directly used on the application server without any data sanitization. In extreme cases, the attacker can change variables controlling the business logic of the application. For instance, in languages like PHP, a number of poorly set default configurations may allow the user to override variables.
Access
VectorComplexityAuthentication
NETWORK LOW SINGLE
Impact
ConfidentialityIntegrityAvailability
NONE PARTIAL NONE
cvss-vector via4 AV:N/AC:L/Au:S/C:N/I:P/A:N
Last major update 13-04-2021 - 17:49
Published 08-04-2021 - 04:15
Last modified 13-04-2021 - 17:49
Back to Top