ID CVE-2020-26262
Summary Coturn is free open source implementation of TURN and STUN Server. Coturn before version 4.5.2 by default does not allow peers to connect and relay packets to loopback addresses in the range of `127.x.x.x`. However, it was observed that when sending a `CONNECT` request with the `XOR-PEER-ADDRESS` value of `0.0.0.0`, a successful response was received and subsequently, `CONNECTIONBIND` also received a successful response. Coturn then is able to relay packets to the loopback interface. Additionally, when coturn is listening on IPv6, which is default, the loopback interface can also be reached by making use of either `[::1]` or `[::]` as the peer address. By using the address `0.0.0.0` as the peer address, a malicious user will be able to relay packets to the loopback interface, unless `--denied-peer-ip=0.0.0.0` (or similar) has been specified. Since the default configuration implies that loopback peers are not allowed, coturn administrators may choose to not set the `denied-peer-ip` setting. The issue patched in version 4.5.2. As a workaround the addresses in the address block `0.0.0.0/8`, `[::1]` and `[::]` should be denied by default unless `--allow-loopback-peers` has been specified.
References
Vulnerable Configurations
CVSS
Base: None
Impact:
Exploitability:
CWE CWE-441
CAPEC
  • DNS Cache Poisoning
    A domain name server translates a domain name (such as www.example.com) into an IP address that Internet hosts use to contact Internet resources. An adversary modifies a public DNS cache to cause certain names to resolve to incorrect addresses that the adversary specifies. The result is that client applications that rely upon the targeted cache for domain name resolution will be directed not to the actual address of the specified domain name but to some other address. Adversaries can use this to herd clients to sites that install malware on the victim's computer or to masquerade as part of a Pharming attack.
  • XML Routing Detour Attacks
    An attacker subverts an intermediate system used to process XML content and forces the intermediate to modify and/or re-route the processing of the content. XML Routing Detour Attacks are Man in the Middle type attacks. The attacker compromises or inserts an intermediate system in the processing of the XML message. For example, WS-Routing can be used to specify a series of nodes or intermediaries through which content is passed. If any of the intermediate nodes in this route are compromised by an attacker they could be used for a routing detour attack. From the compromised system the attacker is able to route the XML process to other nodes of his or her choice and modify the responses so that the normal chain of processing is unaware of the interception. This system can forward the message to an outside entity and hide the forwarding and processing from the legitimate processing systems by altering the header information.
  • Transparent Proxy Abuse
    A transparent proxy serves as an intermediate between the client and the internet at large. It intercepts all requests originating from the client and forwards them to the correct location. The proxy also intercepts all responses to the client and forwards these to the client. All of this is done in a manner transparent to the client. Transparent proxies are often used by enterprises and ISPs. For requests originating at the client transparent proxies need to figure out the final destination of the client's data packet. Two ways are available to do that: either by looking at the layer three (network) IP address or by examining layer seven (application) HTTP header destination. A browser has same origin policy that typically prevents scripts coming from one domain initiating requests to other websites from which they did not come. To circumvent that, however, malicious Flash or an Applet that is executing in the user's browser can attempt to create a cross-domain socket connection from the client to the remote domain. The transparent proxy will examine the HTTP header of the request and direct it to the remote site thereby partially bypassing the browser's same origin policy. This can happen if the transparent proxy uses the HTTP host header information for addressing rather than the IP address information at the network layer. This attack allows malicious scripts inside the victim's browser to issue cross-domain requests to any hosts accessible to the transparent proxy.
  • Cache Poisoning
    An attacker exploits the functionality of cache technologies to cause specific data to be cached that aids the attackers' objectives. This describes any attack whereby an attacker places incorrect or harmful material in cache. The targeted cache can be an application's cache (e.g. a web browser cache) or a public cache (e.g. a DNS or ARP cache). Until the cache is refreshed, most applications or clients will treat the corrupted cache value as valid. This can lead to a wide range of exploits including redirecting web browsers towards sites that install malware and repeatedly incorrect calculations based on the incorrect value.
Access
VectorComplexityAuthentication
Impact
ConfidentialityIntegrityAvailability
Last major update 13-01-2021 - 19:33
Published 13-01-2021 - 19:15
Last modified 13-01-2021 - 19:33
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