ID CVE-2018-1050
Summary All versions of Samba from 4.0.0 onwards are vulnerable to a denial of service attack when the RPC spoolss service is configured to be run as an external daemon. Missing input sanitization checks on some of the input parameters to spoolss RPC calls could cause the print spooler service to crash.
References
Vulnerable Configurations
  • Canonical Ubuntu Linux 12.04 ESM (Extended Security Maintenance)
    cpe:2.3:o:canonical:ubuntu_linux:12.04:-:-:-:esm
  • Canonical Ubuntu Linux 14.04 LTS (Long-Term Support)
    cpe:2.3:o:canonical:ubuntu_linux:14.04:-:-:-:lts
  • Canonical Ubuntu Linux 16.04 LTS (Long-Term Support)
    cpe:2.3:o:canonical:ubuntu_linux:16.04:-:-:-:lts
  • Canonical Ubuntu Linux 17.10 LTS Edition
    cpe:2.3:o:canonical:ubuntu_linux:17.10:-:-:-:lts
  • Samba 4.0.0
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.0
  • Samba 4.0.1
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.1
  • Samba 4.0.2
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.2
  • Samba 4.0.3
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.3
  • Samba 4.0.4
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.4
  • Samba 4.0.5
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.5
  • Samba 4.0.6
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.6
  • Samba 4.0.7
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.7
  • Samba 4.0.8
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.8
  • Samba 4.0.9
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.9
  • Samba 4.0.10
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.10
  • Samba 4.0.11
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.11
  • Samba 4.0.12
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.12
  • Samba 4.0.13
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.13
  • Samba 4.0.14
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.14
  • Samba 4.0.15
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.15
  • Samba 4.0.16
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.16
  • Samba 4.0.17
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.17
  • Samba 4.0.18
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.18
  • Samba 4.0.19
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.19
  • Samba 4.0.20
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.20
  • Samba 4.0.21
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.21
  • Samba 4.0.22
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.22
  • Samba 4.0.23
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.23
  • Samba 4.0.24
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.24
  • Samba 4.0.25
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.25
  • Samba 4.0.26
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.0.26
  • Samba 4.1.0
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.0
  • Samba 4.1.1
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.1
  • Samba 4.1.2
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.2
  • Samba 4.1.3
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.3
  • Samba 4.1.4
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.4
  • Samba 4.1.5
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.5
  • Samba 4.1.6
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.6
  • Samba 4.1.7
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.7
  • Samba 4.1.8
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.8
  • Samba 4.1.9
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.9
  • Samba 4.1.10
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.10
  • Samba 4.1.11
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.11
  • Samba 4.1.12
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.12
  • Samba 4.1.13
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.13
  • Samba 4.1.14
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.14
  • Samba 4.1.15
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.15
  • Samba 4.1.16
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.16
  • Samba 4.1.17
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.17
  • Samba 4.1.18
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.18
  • Samba 4.1.19
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.19
  • Samba 4.1.20
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.20
  • Samba 4.1.21
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.21
  • Samba 4.1.22
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.22
  • Samba 4.1.23
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.1.23
  • Samba 4.2.0
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.0
  • Samba 4.2.0 release candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.0:rc1
  • Samba 4.2.0 release candidate 2
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.0:rc2
  • Samba 4.2.0 release candidate 3
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.0:rc3
  • Samba 4.2.0 release candidate 4
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.0:rc4
  • Samba 4.2.1
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.1
  • Samba 4.2.2
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.2
  • Samba 4.2.3
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.3
  • Samba 4.2.4
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.4
  • Samba 4.2.5
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.5
  • Samba 4.2.6
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.6
  • Samba 4.2.7
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.7
  • Samba 4.2.8
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.8
  • Samba 4.2.9
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.9
  • Samba 4.2.10
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.10
  • Samba 4.2.11
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.11
  • Samba 4.2.12
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.12
  • Samba 4.2.13
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.13
  • Samba 4.2.14
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.2.14
  • Samba 4.3.0
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.3.0
  • Samba 4.3.1
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.3.1
  • Samba 4.3.2
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.3.2
  • Samba 4.3.3
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.3.3
  • Samba 4.3.4
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.3.4
  • Samba 4.3.5
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.3.5
  • Samba 4.3.6
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.3.6
  • Samba 4.3.7
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.3.7
  • Samba 4.3.8
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.3.8
  • Samba 4.3.9
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.3.9
  • Samba 4.3.10
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.3.10
  • Samba 4.3.11
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.3.11
  • Samba 4.3.12
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.3.12
  • Samba 4.3.13
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.3.13
  • Samba 4.4.0
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.0
  • Samba 4.4.0 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.0:rc1
  • Samba 4.4.0 Release Candidate 2
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.0:rc2
  • Samba 4.4.0 Release Candidate 3
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.0:rc3
  • Samba 4.4.1
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.1
  • Samba 4.4.2
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.2
  • Samba 4.4.3
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.3
  • Samba 4.4.4
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.4
  • Samba 4.4.5
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.5
  • Samba 4.4.6
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.6
  • Samba 4.4.7
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.7
  • Samba 4.4.8
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.8
  • Samba 4.4.9
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.9
  • Samba 4.4.10
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.10
  • Samba 4.4.11
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.11
  • Samba 4.4.12
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.12
  • Samba 4.4.13
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.13
  • Samba 4.4.14
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.14
  • Samba 4.4.15
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.15
  • Samba 4.4.16
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.4.16
  • Samba 4.5.0
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.0
  • Samba 4.5.0 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.0:rc1
  • Samba 4.5.0 Release Candidate 2
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.0:rc2
  • Samba 4.5.0 Release Candidate 3
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.0:rc3
  • Samba 4.5.1
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.1
  • Samba 4.5.2
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.2
  • Samba 4.5.3
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.3
  • Samba 4.5.4
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.4
  • Samba 4.5.5
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.5
  • Samba 4.5.6
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.6
  • Samba 4.5.7
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.7
  • Samba 4.5.8
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.8
  • Samba 4.5.9
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.9
  • Samba 4.5.10
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.10
  • Samba 4.5.11
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.11
  • Samba 4.5.12
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.12
  • Samba 4.5.13
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.13
  • Samba 4.5.14
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.14
  • Samba 4.5.15
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.15
  • Samba 4.5.16
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.5.16
  • Samba 4.6.0
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.0
  • Samba 4.6.0 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.0:rc1
  • Samba 4.6.0 Release Candidate 2
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.0:rc2
  • Samba 4.6.0 Release Candidate 3
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.0:rc3
  • Samba 4.6.0 Release Candidate 4
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.0:rc4
  • Samba 4.6.1
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.1
  • Samba 4.6.2
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.2
  • Samba 4.6.3
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.3
  • Samba 4.6.4
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.4
  • Samba 4.6.5
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.5
  • Samba 4.6.6
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.6
  • Samba 4.6.7
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.7
  • Samba 4.6.8
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.8
  • Samba 4.6.9
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.9
  • Samba 4.6.10
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.10
  • Samba 4.6.11
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.11
  • Samba 4.6.12
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.12
  • Samba 4.6.13
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.13
  • Samba 4.6.14
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.14
  • Samba 4.6.15
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.15
  • Samba 4.6.16
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.6.16
  • Samba 4.7.0
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.0
  • Samba 4.7.0 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.0:rc1
  • Samba 4.7.0 Release Candidate 2
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.0:rc2
  • Samba 4.7.0 Release Candidate 3
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.0:rc3
  • Samba 4.7.0 Release Candidate 4
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.0:rc4
  • Samba 4.7.0 Release Candidate 5
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.0:rc5
  • Samba 4.7.0 Release Candidate 6
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.0:rc6
  • Samba 4.7.1
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.1
  • Samba 4.7.2
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.2
  • Samba 4.7.3
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.3
  • Samba 4.7.4
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.4
  • Samba 4.7.5
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.5
  • Samba 4.7.6
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.6
  • Samba 4.7.7
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.7
  • Samba 4.7.8
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.8
  • Samba 4.7.9
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.9
  • Samba 4.7.10
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.10
  • Samba 4.7.11
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.11
  • Samba 4.7.12
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.7.12
  • Samba 4.8.0
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.8.0
  • Samba 4.8.0 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.8.0:rc1
  • Samba 4.8.0 Release Candidate 2
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.8.0:rc2
  • Samba 4.8.0 Release Candidate 3
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.8.0:rc3
  • Samba 4.8.0 Release Candidate 4
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.8.0:rc4
  • Samba 4.8.1
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.8.1
  • Samba 4.8.2
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.8.2
  • Samba 4.8.3
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.8.3
  • Samba 4.8.4
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.8.4
  • Samba 4.8.5
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.8.5
  • Samba 4.8.6
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.8.6
  • Samba 4.8.7
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.8.7
  • Samba 4.8.8
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.8.8
  • Samba 4.8.9
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.8.9
  • Samba 4.8.11
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.8.11
  • Samba 4.9.0
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.9.0
  • Samba 4.9.1
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.9.1
  • Samba 4.9.2
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.9.2
  • Samba 4.9.3
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.9.3
  • Samba 4.9.4
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.9.4
  • Samba 4.9.6
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.9.6
  • Samba 4.10.0
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.10.0
  • Samba 4.10.2
    cpe:2.3:a:samba:samba:4.10.2
  • Debian Linux 7.0
    cpe:2.3:o:debian:debian_linux:7.0
  • Debian Linux 8.0 (Jessie)
    cpe:2.3:o:debian:debian_linux:8.0
  • Debian Linux 9.0
    cpe:2.3:o:debian:debian_linux:9.0
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop 6.0
    cpe:2.3:o:redhat:enterprise_linux_desktop:6.0
  • RedHat Enterprise Linux Desktop 7.0
    cpe:2.3:o:redhat:enterprise_linux_desktop:7.0
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server 6.0
    cpe:2.3:o:redhat:enterprise_linux_server:6.0
  • RedHat Enterprise Linux Server 7.0
    cpe:2.3:o:redhat:enterprise_linux_server:7.0
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation 6.0
    cpe:2.3:o:redhat:enterprise_linux_workstation:6.0
  • RedHat Enterprise Linux Workstation 7.0
    cpe:2.3:o:redhat:enterprise_linux_workstation:7.0
CVSS
Base: 2.9
Impact:
Exploitability:
CWE CWE-20
CAPEC
  • Buffer Overflow via Environment Variables
    This attack pattern involves causing a buffer overflow through manipulation of environment variables. Once the attacker finds that they can modify an environment variable, they may try to overflow associated buffers. This attack leverages implicit trust often placed in environment variables.
  • Server Side Include (SSI) Injection
    An attacker can use Server Side Include (SSI) Injection to send code to a web application that then gets executed by the web server. Doing so enables the attacker to achieve similar results to Cross Site Scripting, viz., arbitrary code execution and information disclosure, albeit on a more limited scale, since the SSI directives are nowhere near as powerful as a full-fledged scripting language. Nonetheless, the attacker can conveniently gain access to sensitive files, such as password files, and execute shell commands.
  • Cross Zone Scripting
    An attacker is able to cause a victim to load content into their web-browser that bypasses security zone controls and gain access to increased privileges to execute scripting code or other web objects such as unsigned ActiveX controls or applets. This is a privilege elevation attack targeted at zone-based web-browser security. In a zone-based model, pages belong to one of a set of zones corresponding to the level of privilege assigned to that page. Pages in an untrusted zone would have a lesser level of access to the system and/or be restricted in the types of executable content it was allowed to invoke. In a cross-zone scripting attack, a page that should be assigned to a less privileged zone is granted the privileges of a more trusted zone. This can be accomplished by exploiting bugs in the browser, exploiting incorrect configuration in the zone controls, through a cross-site scripting attack that causes the attackers' content to be treated as coming from a more trusted page, or by leveraging some piece of system functionality that is accessible from both the trusted and less trusted zone. This attack differs from "Restful Privilege Escalation" in that the latter correlates to the inadequate securing of RESTful access methods (such as HTTP DELETE) on the server, while cross-zone scripting attacks the concept of security zones as implemented by a browser.
  • Cross Site Scripting through Log Files
    An attacker may leverage a system weakness where logs are susceptible to log injection to insert scripts into the system's logs. If these logs are later viewed by an administrator through a thin administrative interface and the log data is not properly HTML encoded before being written to the page, the attackers' scripts stored in the log will be executed in the administrative interface with potentially serious consequences. This attack pattern is really a combination of two other attack patterns: log injection and stored cross site scripting.
  • Command Line Execution through SQL Injection
    An attacker uses standard SQL injection methods to inject data into the command line for execution. This could be done directly through misuse of directives such as MSSQL_xp_cmdshell or indirectly through injection of data into the database that would be interpreted as shell commands. Sometime later, an unscrupulous backend application (or could be part of the functionality of the same application) fetches the injected data stored in the database and uses this data as command line arguments without performing proper validation. The malicious data escapes that data plane by spawning new commands to be executed on the host.
  • Object Relational Mapping Injection
    An attacker leverages a weakness present in the database access layer code generated with an Object Relational Mapping (ORM) tool or a weakness in the way that a developer used a persistence framework to inject his or her own SQL commands to be executed against the underlying database. The attack here is similar to plain SQL injection, except that the application does not use JDBC to directly talk to the database, but instead it uses a data access layer generated by an ORM tool or framework (e.g. Hibernate). While most of the time code generated by an ORM tool contains safe access methods that are immune to SQL injection, sometimes either due to some weakness in the generated code or due to the fact that the developer failed to use the generated access methods properly, SQL injection is still possible.
  • SQL Injection through SOAP Parameter Tampering
    An attacker modifies the parameters of the SOAP message that is sent from the service consumer to the service provider to initiate a SQL injection attack. On the service provider side, the SOAP message is parsed and parameters are not properly validated before being used to access a database in a way that does not use parameter binding, thus enabling the attacker to control the structure of the executed SQL query. This pattern describes a SQL injection attack with the delivery mechanism being a SOAP message.
  • Subverting Environment Variable Values
    The attacker directly or indirectly modifies environment variables used by or controlling the target software. The attacker's goal is to cause the target software to deviate from its expected operation in a manner that benefits the attacker.
  • Format String Injection
    An attacker includes formatting characters in a string input field on the target application. Most applications assume that users will provide static text and may respond unpredictably to the presence of formatting character. For example, in certain functions of the C programming languages such as printf, the formatting character %s will print the contents of a memory location expecting this location to identify a string and the formatting character %n prints the number of DWORD written in the memory. An attacker can use this to read or write to memory locations or files, or simply to manipulate the value of the resulting text in unexpected ways. Reading or writing memory may result in program crashes and writing memory could result in the execution of arbitrary code if the attacker can write to the program stack.
  • LDAP Injection
    An attacker manipulates or crafts an LDAP query for the purpose of undermining the security of the target. Some applications use user input to create LDAP queries that are processed by an LDAP server. For example, a user might provide their username during authentication and the username might be inserted in an LDAP query during the authentication process. An attacker could use this input to inject additional commands into an LDAP query that could disclose sensitive information. For example, entering a * in the aforementioned query might return information about all users on the system. This attack is very similar to an SQL injection attack in that it manipulates a query to gather additional information or coerce a particular return value.
  • Relative Path Traversal
    An attacker exploits a weakness in input validation on the target by supplying a specially constructed path utilizing dot and slash characters for the purpose of obtaining access to arbitrary files or resources. An attacker modifies a known path on the target in order to reach material that is not available through intended channels. These attacks normally involve adding additional path separators (/ or \) and/or dots (.), or encodings thereof, in various combinations in order to reach parent directories or entirely separate trees of the target's directory structure.
  • Client-side Injection-induced Buffer Overflow
    This type of attack exploits a buffer overflow vulnerability in targeted client software through injection of malicious content from a custom-built hostile service.
  • Variable Manipulation
    An attacker manipulates variables used by an application to perform a variety of possible attacks. This can either be performed through the manipulation of function call parameters or by manipulating external variables, such as environment variables, that are used by an application. Changing variable values is usually undertaken as part of another attack; for example, a path traversal (inserting relative path modifiers) or buffer overflow (enlarging a variable value beyond an application's ability to store it).
  • Embedding Scripts in Non-Script Elements
    This attack is a form of Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) where malicious scripts are embedded in elements that are not expected to host scripts such as image tags (<img>), comments in XML documents (< !-CDATA->), etc. These tags may not be subject to the same input validation, output validation, and other content filtering and checking routines, so this can create an opportunity for an attacker to tunnel through the application's elements and launch a XSS attack through other elements. As with all remote attacks, it is important to differentiate the ability to launch an attack (such as probing an internal network for unpatched servers) and the ability of the remote attacker to collect and interpret the output of said attack.
  • Flash Injection
    An attacker tricks a victim to execute malicious flash content that executes commands or makes flash calls specified by the attacker. One example of this attack is cross-site flashing, an attacker controlled parameter to a reference call loads from content specified by the attacker.
  • Cross-Site Scripting Using Alternate Syntax
    The attacker uses alternate forms of keywords or commands that result in the same action as the primary form but which may not be caught by filters. For example, many keywords are processed in a case insensitive manner. If the site's web filtering algorithm does not convert all tags into a consistent case before the comparison with forbidden keywords it is possible to bypass filters (e.g., incomplete black lists) by using an alternate case structure. For example, the