ID CVE-2012-0478
Summary The texImage2D implementation in the WebGL subsystem in Mozilla Firefox 4.x through 11.0, Firefox ESR 10.x before 10.0.4, Thunderbird 5.0 through 11.0, Thunderbird ESR 10.x before 10.0.4, and SeaMonkey before 2.9 does not properly restrict JSVAL_TO_OBJECT casts, which might allow remote attackers to execute arbitrary code via a crafted web page.
References
Vulnerable Configurations
  • Mozilla Firefox 4.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:4.0
  • Mozilla Firefox 4.0 beta1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:4.0:beta1
  • Mozilla Firefox 4.0 beta10
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:4.0:beta10
  • Mozilla Firefox 4.0 beta11
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:4.0:beta11
  • Mozilla Firefox 4.0 beta12
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:4.0:beta12
  • Mozilla Firefox 4.0 beta2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:4.0:beta2
  • Mozilla Firefox 4.0 beta3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:4.0:beta3
  • Mozilla Firefox 4.0 beta4
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:4.0:beta4
  • Mozilla Firefox 4.0 beta5
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:4.0:beta5
  • Mozilla Firefox 4.0 beta6
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:4.0:beta6
  • Mozilla Firefox 4.0 beta7
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:4.0:beta7
  • Mozilla Firefox 4.0 beta8
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:4.0:beta8
  • Mozilla Firefox 4.0 beta9
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:4.0:beta9
  • Mozilla Firefox 4.0.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:4.0.1
  • Mozilla Firefox 5.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:5.0
  • Mozilla Firefox 5.0.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:5.0.1
  • Mozilla Firefox 6.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:6.0
  • Mozilla Firefox 6.0.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:6.0.1
  • Mozilla Firefox 6.0.2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:6.0.2
  • Mozilla Firefox 7.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:7.0
  • Mozilla Firefox 7.0.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:7.0.1
  • Mozilla Firefox 8.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:8.0
  • Mozilla Firefox 8.0.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:8.0.1
  • Mozilla Firefox 9.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:9.0
  • Mozilla Firefox 9.0.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:9.0.1
  • Mozilla Firefox 10.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:10.0
  • Mozilla Firefox 10.0.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:10.0.1
  • Mozilla Firefox 10.0.2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:10.0.2
  • Mozilla Firefox 11.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox:11.0
  • Mozilla Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR) 10.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox_esr:10.0
  • Mozilla Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR) 10.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox_esr:10.0.1
  • Mozilla Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR) 10.0.2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox_esr:10.0.2
  • Mozilla Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR) 10.0.3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:firefox_esr:10.0.3
  • Mozilla Thunderbird 5.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird:5.0
  • Mozilla Thunderbird 6.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird:6.0
  • Mozilla Thunderbird 6.0.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird:6.0.1
  • Mozilla Thunderbird 6.0.2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird:6.0.2
  • Mozilla Thunderbird 7.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird:7.0
  • Mozilla Thunderbird 7.0.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird:7.0.1
  • Mozilla Thunderbird 8.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird:8.0
  • Mozilla Thunderbird 9.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird:9.0
  • Mozilla Thunderbird 9.0.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird:9.0.1
  • Mozilla Thunderbird 10.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird:10.0
  • Mozilla Thunderbird 10.0.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird:10.0.1
  • Mozilla Thunderbird 10.0.2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird:10.0.2
  • Mozilla Thunderbird 10.0.3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird:10.0.3
  • Mozilla Thunderbird 10.0.4
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird:10.0.4
  • Mozilla Thunderbird 11.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird:11.0
  • Mozilla Thunderbird Extended Support Release (ESR) 10.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird_esr:10.0
  • Mozilla Thunderbird Extended Support Release (ESR) 10.0.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird_esr:10.0.1
  • Mozilla Thunderbird Extended Support Release (ESR) 10.0.2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird_esr:10.0.2
  • Mozilla Thunderbird Extended Support Release (ESR) 10.0.3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:thunderbird_esr:10.0.3
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.0
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.0 alpha
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.0:alpha
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.0 beta
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.0:beta
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.0.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.0.1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.0.2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.0.2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.0.3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.0.3
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.0.4
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.0.4
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.0.5
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.0.5
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.0.6
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.0.6
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.0.7
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.0.7
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.0.8
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.0.8
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.0.9
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.0.9
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.1 alpha
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1:alpha
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.1 beta
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1:beta
  • Mozilla Seamonkey 1.1.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.1
  • Mozilla Seamonkey 1.1.2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.2
  • Mozilla Seamonkey 1.1.3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.3
  • Mozilla Seamonkey 1.1.4
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.4
  • Mozilla Seamonkey 1.1.5
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.5
  • Mozilla Seamonkey 1.1.6
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.6
  • Mozilla Seamonkey 1.1.7
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.7
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.1.8
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.8
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.1.9
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.9
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.1.10
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.10
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.1.11
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.11
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.1.12
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.12
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.1.13
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.13
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.1.14
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.14
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.1.15
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.15
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.1.16
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.16
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.1.17
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.17
  • Mozilla Seamonkey 1.1.18
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.18
  • Mozilla Seamonkey 1.1.19
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.1.19
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.5.0.8
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.5.0.8
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.5.0.9
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.5.0.9
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 1.5.0.10
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:1.5.0.10
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0 Alpha 1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0:alpha_1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0 Alpha 2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0:alpha_2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0 Alpha 3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0:alpha_3
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0 Beta 1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0:beta_1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0 Beta 2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0:beta_2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0 RC1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0:rc1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0 RC2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0:rc2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0.1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0.2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0.2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0.3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0.3
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0.4
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0.4
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0.5
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0.5
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0.6
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0.6
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0.7
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0.7
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0.8
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0.8
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0.9
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0.9
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0.10
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0.10
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0.11
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0.11
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0.12
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0.12
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0.13
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0.13
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.0.14
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.0.14
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.1 alpha1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.1:alpha1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.1 alpha2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.1:alpha2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.1 alpha3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.1:alpha3
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.1 Beta 1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.1:beta1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.1 Beta 2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.1:beta2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.1 Beta 3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.1:beta3
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.1 Release Candidate 1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.1:rc1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.1 Release Candidate 2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.1:rc2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.2 Beta 1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.2:beta1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.2 Beta 2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.2:beta2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.2 Beta 3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.2:beta3
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.3
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.3 Beta1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.3:beta1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.3 Beta 2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.3:beta2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.3 Beta 3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.3:beta3
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.3.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.3.1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.3.2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.3.2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.3.3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.3.3
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.4
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.4
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.4 Beta 1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.4:beta1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.4 Beta 2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.4:beta2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.4 Beta 3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.4:beta3
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.4.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.4.1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.5
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.5
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.5 Beta 1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.5:beta1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.5 Beta 2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.5:beta2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.5 Beta 3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.5:beta3
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.5 Beta 4
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.5:beta4
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.6
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.6
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.6 Beta 1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.6:beta1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.6 Beta 2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.6:beta2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.6 Beta 3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.6:beta3
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.6 Beta 4
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.6:beta4
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.6.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.6.1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.7
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.7
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.7 Beta 1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.7:beta1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.7 Beta 2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.7:beta2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.7 Beta 3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.7:beta3
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.7 Beta 4
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.7:beta4
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.7 Beta 5
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.7:beta5
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.7.1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.7.1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.7.2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.7.2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.8
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.8
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.8 Beta 1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.8:beta1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.8 Beta 2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.8:beta2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.8 Beta 3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.8:beta3
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.8 Beta 4
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.8:beta4
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.8 Beta 5
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.8:beta5
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.8 Beta 6
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.8:beta6
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.9 Beta 1
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.9:beta1
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.9 Beta 2
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.9:beta2
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey 2.9 Beta 3
    cpe:2.3:a:mozilla:seamonkey:2.9:beta3
CVSS
Base: 9.3 (as of 25-04-2012 - 10:36)
Impact:
Exploitability:
CWE CWE-264
CAPEC
  • Accessing, Modifying or Executing Executable Files
    An attack of this type exploits a system's configuration that allows an attacker to either directly access an executable file, for example through shell access; or in a possible worst case allows an attacker to upload a file and then execute it. Web servers, ftp servers, and message oriented middleware systems which have many integration points are particularly vulnerable, because both the programmers and the administrators must be in synch regarding the interfaces and the correct privileges for each interface.
  • Leverage Executable Code in Non-Executable Files
    An attack of this type exploits a system's trust in configuration and resource files, when the executable loads the resource (such as an image file or configuration file) the attacker has modified the file to either execute malicious code directly or manipulate the target process (e.g. application server) to execute based on the malicious configuration parameters. Since systems are increasingly interrelated mashing up resources from local and remote sources the possibility of this attack occurring is high. The attack can be directed at a client system, such as causing buffer overrun through loading seemingly benign image files, as in Microsoft Security Bulletin MS04-028 where specially crafted JPEG files could cause a buffer overrun once loaded into the browser. Another example targets clients reading pdf files. In this case the attacker simply appends javascript to the end of a legitimate url for a pdf (http://www.gnucitizen.org/blog/danger-danger-danger/) http://path/to/pdf/file.pdf#whatever_name_you_want=javascript:your_code_here The client assumes that they are reading a pdf, but the attacker has modified the resource and loaded executable javascript into the client's browser process. The attack can also target server processes. The attacker edits the resource or configuration file, for example a web.xml file used to configure security permissions for a J2EE app server, adding role name "public" grants all users with the public role the ability to use the administration functionality. The server trusts its configuration file to be correct, but when they are manipulated, the attacker gains full control.
  • Blue Boxing
    This type of attack against older telephone switches and trunks has been around for decades. A tone is sent by an adversary to impersonate a supervisor signal which has the effect of rerouting or usurping command of the line. While the US infrastructure proper may not contain widespread vulnerabilities to this type of attack, many companies are connected globally through call centers and business process outsourcing. These international systems may be operated in countries which have not upgraded Telco infrastructure and so are vulnerable to Blue boxing. Blue boxing is a result of failure on the part of the system to enforce strong authorization for administrative functions. While the infrastructure is different than standard current applications like web applications, there are historical lessons to be learned to upgrade the access control for administrative functions.
  • Restful Privilege Elevation
    Rest uses standard HTTP (Get, Put, Delete) style permissions methods, but these are not necessarily correlated generally with back end programs. Strict interpretation of HTTP get methods means that these HTTP Get services should not be used to delete information on the server, but there is no access control mechanism to back up this logic. This means that unless the services are properly ACL'd and the application's service implementation are following these guidelines then an HTTP request can easily execute a delete or update on the server side. The attacker identifies a HTTP Get URL such as http://victimsite/updateOrder, which calls out to a program to update orders on a database or other resource. The URL is not idempotent so the request can be submitted multiple times by the attacker, additionally, the attacker may be able to exploit the URL published as a Get method that actually performs updates (instead of merely retrieving data). This may result in malicious or inadvertent altering of data on the server.
  • Target Programs with Elevated Privileges
    This attack targets programs running with elevated privileges. The attacker would try to leverage a bug in the running program and get arbitrary code to execute with elevated privileges. For instance an attacker would look for programs that write to the system directories or registry keys (such as HKLM, which stores a number of critical Windows environment variables). These programs are typically running with elevated privileges and have usually not been designed with security in mind. Such programs are excellent exploit targets because they yield lots of power when they break. The malicious user try to execute its code at the same level as a privileged system call.
  • Manipulating Input to File System Calls
    An attacker manipulates inputs to the target software which the target software passes to file system calls in the OS. The goal is to gain access to, and perhaps modify, areas of the file system that the target software did not intend to be accessible.
Access
VectorComplexityAuthentication
NETWORK MEDIUM NONE
Impact
ConfidentialityIntegrityAvailability
COMPLETE COMPLETE COMPLETE
nessus via4
  • NASL family SuSE Local Security Checks
    NASL id SUSE_11_FIREFOX-201204-120426.NASL
    description Mozilla Firefox was updated to the 10.0.4 ESR release to fix various bugs and security issues. - Mozilla developers identified and fixed several memory safety bugs in the browser engine used in Firefox and other Mozilla-based products. Some of these bugs showed evidence of memory corruption under certain circumstances, and we presume that with enough effort at least some of these could be exploited to run arbitrary code. (MFSA 2012-20) In general these flaws cannot be exploited through email in the Thunderbird and SeaMonkey products because scripting is disabled, but are potentially a risk in browser or browser-like contexts in those products. Christian Holler a reported memory safety and security problem affecting Firefox 11. (CVE-2012-0468) Bob Clary, Christian Holler, Brian Hackett, Bobby Holley, Gary Kwong, Hilary Hall, Honza Bambas, Jesse Ruderman, Julian Seward, and Olli Pettay reported memory safety problems and crashes that affect Firefox ESR and Firefox 11. (CVE-2012-0467) - Using the Address Sanitizer tool, security researcher Aki Helin from OUSPG found that IDBKeyRange of indexedDB remains in the XPConnect hashtable instead of being unlinked before being destroyed. When it is destroyed, this causes a use-after-free, which is potentially exploitable. (MFSA 2012-22 / CVE-2012-0469) - Using the Address Sanitizer tool, security researcher Atte Kettunen from OUSPG found a heap corruption in gfxImageSurface which allows for invalid frees and possible remote code execution. This happens due to float error, resulting from graphics values being passed through different number systems. (MFSA 2012-23 / CVE-2012-0470) - Anne van Kesteren of Opera Software found a multi-octet encoding issue where certain octets will destroy the following octets in the processing of some multibyte character sets. This can leave users vulnerable to cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks on maliciously crafted web pages. (MFSA 2012-24 / CVE-2012-0471) - Security research firm iDefense reported that researcher wushi of team509 discovered a memory corruption on Windows Vista and Windows 7 systems with hardware acceleration disabled or using incompatible video drivers. This is created by using cairo-dwrite to attempt to render fonts on an unsupported code path. This corruption causes a potentially exploitable crash on affected systems. (MFSA 2012-25 / CVE-2012-0472) - Mozilla community member Matias Juntunen discovered an error in WebGLBuffer where FindMaxElementInSubArray receives wrong template arguments from FindMaxUshortElement. This bug causes maximum index to be computed incorrectly within WebGL.drawElements, allowing the reading of illegal video memory. (MFSA 2012-26 / CVE-2012-0473) - Security researchers Jordi Chancel and Eddy Bordi reported that they could short-circuit page loads to show the address of a different site than what is loaded in the window in the addressbar. Security researcher Chris McGowen independently reported the same flaw, and further demonstrated that this could lead to loading scripts from the attacker's site, leaving users vulnerable to cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks. (MFSA 2012-27 / CVE-2012-0474) - Security researcher Simone Fabiano reported that if a cross-site XHR or WebSocket is opened on a web server on a non-standard port for web traffic while using an IPv6 address, the browser will send an ambiguous origin headers if the IPv6 address contains at least 2 consecutive 16-bit fields of zeroes. If there is an origin access control list that uses IPv6 literals, this issue could be used to bypass these access controls on the server. (MFSA 2012-28 / CVE-2012-0475) - Security researcher Masato Kinugawa found that during the decoding of ISO-2022-KR and ISO-2022-CN character sets, characters near 1024 bytes are treated incorrectly, either doubling or deleting bytes. On certain pages it might be possible for an attacker to pad the output of the page such that these errors fall in the right place to affect the structure of the page, allowing for cross-site script (XSS) injection. (MFSA 2012-29 / CVE-2012-0477) - Mozilla community member Ms2ger found an image rendering issue with WebGL when texImage2D uses use JSVAL_TO_OBJECT on arbitrary objects. This can lead to a crash on a maliciously crafted web page. While there is no evidence that this is directly exploitable, there is a possibility of remote code execution. (MFSA 2012-30 / CVE-2012-0478) - Mateusz Jurczyk of the Google Security Team discovered an off-by-one error in the OpenType Sanitizer using the Address Sanitizer tool. This can lead to an out-of-bounds read and execution of an uninitialized function pointer during parsing and possible remote code execution. (MFSA 2012-31 / CVE-2011-3062) - Security researcher Daniel Divricean reported that a defect in the error handling of JavaScript errors can leak the file names and location of JavaScript files on a server, leading to inadvertent information disclosure and a vector for further attacks. (MFSA 2012-32 / CVE-2011-1187) - Security researcher Jeroen van der Gun reported that if RSS or Atom XML invalid content is loaded over HTTPS, the addressbar updates to display the new location of the loaded resource, including SSL indicators, while the main window still displays the previously loaded content. This allows for phishing attacks where a malicious page can spoof the identify of another seemingly secure site. (MFSA 2012-33 / CVE-2012-0479)
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-06-29
    plugin id 58973
    published