ID CVE-2011-0010
Summary check.c in sudo 1.7.x before 1.7.4p5, when a Runas group is configured, does not require a password for command execution that involves a gid change but no uid change, which allows local users to bypass an intended authentication requirement via the -g option to a sudo command.
References
Vulnerable Configurations
  • Todd Miller Sudo 1.7.0
    cpe:2.3:a:todd_miller:sudo:1.7.0
  • Todd Miller Sudo 1.7.1
    cpe:2.3:a:todd_miller:sudo:1.7.1
  • Todd Miller Sudo 1.7.2
    cpe:2.3:a:todd_miller:sudo:1.7.2
  • Todd Miller Sudo 1.7.2p1
    cpe:2.3:a:todd_miller:sudo:1.7.2p1
  • Todd Miller Sudo 1.7.2p2
    cpe:2.3:a:todd_miller:sudo:1.7.2p2
  • Todd Miller Sudo 1.7.2p3
    cpe:2.3:a:todd_miller:sudo:1.7.2p3
  • Todd Miller Sudo 1.7.2p4
    cpe:2.3:a:todd_miller:sudo:1.7.2p4
  • Todd Miller Sudo 1.7.2p5
    cpe:2.3:a:todd_miller:sudo:1.7.2p5
  • Todd Miller Sudo 1.7.2p6
    cpe:2.3:a:todd_miller:sudo:1.7.2p6
  • Todd Miller Sudo 1.7.2p7
    cpe:2.3:a:todd_miller:sudo:1.7.2p7
  • Todd Miller Sudo 1.7.3b1
    cpe:2.3:a:todd_miller:sudo:1.7.3b1
  • Todd Miller Sudo 1.7.4
    cpe:2.3:a:todd_miller:sudo:1.7.4
  • Todd Miller Sudo 1.7.4p1
    cpe:2.3:a:todd_miller:sudo:1.7.4p1
  • Todd Miller Sudo 1.7.4p2
    cpe:2.3:a:todd_miller:sudo:1.7.4p2
  • Todd Miller Sudo 1.7.4p3
    cpe:2.3:a:todd_miller:sudo:1.7.4p3
  • Todd Miller Sudo 1.7.4p4
    cpe:2.3:a:todd_miller:sudo:1.7.4p4
CVSS
Base: 4.4 (as of 19-01-2011 - 08:53)
Impact:
Exploitability:
CWE CWE-264
CAPEC
  • Accessing, Modifying or Executing Executable Files
    An attack of this type exploits a system's configuration that allows an attacker to either directly access an executable file, for example through shell access; or in a possible worst case allows an attacker to upload a file and then execute it. Web servers, ftp servers, and message oriented middleware systems which have many integration points are particularly vulnerable, because both the programmers and the administrators must be in synch regarding the interfaces and the correct privileges for each interface.
  • Leverage Executable Code in Non-Executable Files
    An attack of this type exploits a system's trust in configuration and resource files, when the executable loads the resource (such as an image file or configuration file) the attacker has modified the file to either execute malicious code directly or manipulate the target process (e.g. application server) to execute based on the malicious configuration parameters. Since systems are increasingly interrelated mashing up resources from local and remote sources the possibility of this attack occurring is high. The attack can be directed at a client system, such as causing buffer overrun through loading seemingly benign image files, as in Microsoft Security Bulletin MS04-028 where specially crafted JPEG files could cause a buffer overrun once loaded into the browser. Another example targets clients reading pdf files. In this case the attacker simply appends javascript to the end of a legitimate url for a pdf (http://www.gnucitizen.org/blog/danger-danger-danger/) http://path/to/pdf/file.pdf#whatever_name_you_want=javascript:your_code_here The client assumes that they are reading a pdf, but the attacker has modified the resource and loaded executable javascript into the client's browser process. The attack can also target server processes. The attacker edits the resource or configuration file, for example a web.xml file used to configure security permissions for a J2EE app server, adding role name "public" grants all users with the public role the ability to use the administration functionality. The server trusts its configuration file to be correct, but when they are manipulated, the attacker gains full control.
  • Blue Boxing
    This type of attack against older telephone switches and trunks has been around for decades. A tone is sent by an adversary to impersonate a supervisor signal which has the effect of rerouting or usurping command of the line. While the US infrastructure proper may not contain widespread vulnerabilities to this type of attack, many companies are connected globally through call centers and business process outsourcing. These international systems may be operated in countries which have not upgraded Telco infrastructure and so are vulnerable to Blue boxing. Blue boxing is a result of failure on the part of the system to enforce strong authorization for administrative functions. While the infrastructure is different than standard current applications like web applications, there are historical lessons to be learned to upgrade the access control for administrative functions.
  • Restful Privilege Elevation
    Rest uses standard HTTP (Get, Put, Delete) style permissions methods, but these are not necessarily correlated generally with back end programs. Strict interpretation of HTTP get methods means that these HTTP Get services should not be used to delete information on the server, but there is no access control mechanism to back up this logic. This means that unless the services are properly ACL'd and the application's service implementation are following these guidelines then an HTTP request can easily execute a delete or update on the server side. The attacker identifies a HTTP Get URL such as http://victimsite/updateOrder, which calls out to a program to update orders on a database or other resource. The URL is not idempotent so the request can be submitted multiple times by the attacker, additionally, the attacker may be able to exploit the URL published as a Get method that actually performs updates (instead of merely retrieving data). This may result in malicious or inadvertent altering of data on the server.
  • Target Programs with Elevated Privileges
    This attack targets programs running with elevated privileges. The attacker would try to leverage a bug in the running program and get arbitrary code to execute with elevated privileges. For instance an attacker would look for programs that write to the system directories or registry keys (such as HKLM, which stores a number of critical Windows environment variables). These programs are typically running with elevated privileges and have usually not been designed with security in mind. Such programs are excellent exploit targets because they yield lots of power when they break. The malicious user try to execute its code at the same level as a privileged system call.
  • Manipulating Input to File System Calls
    An attacker manipulates inputs to the target software which the target software passes to file system calls in the OS. The goal is to gain access to, and perhaps modify, areas of the file system that the target software did not intend to be accessible.
Access
VectorComplexityAuthentication
LOCAL MEDIUM NONE
Impact
ConfidentialityIntegrityAvailability
PARTIAL PARTIAL PARTIAL
nessus via4
  • NASL family Scientific Linux Local Security Checks
    NASL id SL_20110519_SUDO_ON_SL6_X.NASL
    description The sudo (superuser do) utility allows system administrators to give certain users the ability to run commands as root. A flaw was found in the sudo password checking logic. In configurations where the sudoers settings allowed a user to run a command using sudo with only the group ID changed, sudo failed to prompt for the user's password before running the specified command with the elevated group privileges. (CVE-2011-0010) This update also fixes the following bugs : - When the '/etc/sudoers' file contained entries with multiple hosts, running the 'sudo -l' command incorrectly reported that a certain user does not have permissions to use sudo on the system. With this update, running the 'sudo -l' command now produces the correct output. (BZ#603823) - Prior to this update, the manual page for sudoers.ldap was not installed, even though it contains important information on how to set up an LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) sudoers source, and other documents refer to it. With this update, the manual page is now properly included in the package. Additionally, various POD files have been removed from the package, as they are required for build purposes only. (BZ#634159) - The previous version of sudo did not use the same location for the LDAP configuration files as the nss_ldap package. This has been fixed and sudo now looks for these files in the same location as the nss_ldap package. (BZ#652726) - When a file was edited using the 'sudo -e file' or the 'sudoedit file' command, the editor being executed for this task was logged only as 'sudoedit'. With this update, the full path to the executable being used as an editor is now logged (instead of 'sudoedit'). (BZ#665131) - A comment regarding the 'visiblepw' option of the 'Defaults' directive has been added to the default '/etc/sudoers' file to clarify its usage. (BZ#688640) - This erratum upgrades sudo to upstream version 1.7.4p5, which provides a number of bug fixes and enhancements over the previous version. (BZ#615087) All users of sudo are advised to upgrade to this updated package, which resolves these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-12-31
    plugin id 61050
    published 2012-08-01
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=61050
    title Scientific Linux Security Update : sudo on SL6.x i386/x86_64
  • NASL family FreeBSD Local Security Checks
    NASL id FREEBSD_PKG_908F4CF21E8B11E0A587001B77D09812.NASL
    description Todd Miller reports : Beginning with sudo version 1.7.0 it has been possible to grant permission to run a command using a specified group via sudo's -g option (run as group), if allowed by the sudoers file. A flaw exists in sudo's password checking logic that allows a user to run a command with only the group changed without being prompted for a password.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-12-19
    plugin id 51521
    published 2011-01-14
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=51521
    title FreeBSD : sudo -- local privilege escalation (908f4cf2-1e8b-11e0-a587-001b77d09812)
  • NASL family Red Hat Local Security Checks
    NASL id REDHAT-RHSA-2011-0599.NASL
    description An updated sudo package that fixes one security issue and several bugs is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having low security impact. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which gives a detailed severity rating, is available from the CVE link in the References section. The sudo (superuser do) utility allows system administrators to give certain users the ability to run commands as root. A flaw was found in the sudo password checking logic. In configurations where the sudoers settings allowed a user to run a command using sudo with only the group ID changed, sudo failed to prompt for the user's password before running the specified command with the elevated group privileges. (CVE-2011-0010) This update also fixes the following bugs : * When the '/etc/sudoers' file contained entries with multiple hosts, running the 'sudo -l' command incorrectly reported that a certain user does not have permissions to use sudo on the system. With this update, running the 'sudo -l' command now produces the correct output. (BZ#603823) * Prior to this update, the manual page for sudoers.ldap was not installed, even though it contains important information on how to set up an LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) sudoers source, and other documents refer to it. With this update, the manual page is now properly included in the package. Additionally, various POD files have been removed from the package, as they are required for build purposes only. (BZ#634159) * The previous version of sudo did not use the same location for the LDAP configuration files as the nss_ldap package. This has been fixed and sudo now looks for these files in the same location as the nss_ldap package. (BZ#652726) * When a file was edited using the 'sudo -e file' or the 'sudoedit file' command, the editor being executed for this task was logged only as 'sudoedit'. With this update, the full path to the executable being used as an editor is now logged (instead of 'sudoedit'). (BZ#665131) * A comment regarding the 'visiblepw' option of the 'Defaults' directive has been added to the default '/etc/sudoers' file to clarify its usage. (BZ#688640) * This erratum upgrades sudo to upstream version 1.7.4p5, which provides a number of bug fixes and enhancements over the previous version. (BZ#615087) All users of sudo are advised to upgrade to this updated package, which resolves these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2019-01-02
    plugin id 54596
    published 2011-05-20
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=54596
    title RHEL 6 : sudo (RHSA-2011:0599)
  • NASL family Ubuntu Local Security Checks
    NASL id UBUNTU_USN-1046-1.NASL
    description Alexander Kurtz discovered that sudo would not prompt for a password when a group was specified in the Runas_Spec. A local attacker could exploit this to execute arbitrary code as the specified group if sudo was configured to allow the attacker to use a program as this group. The group Runas_Spec is not used in the default installation of Ubuntu. Note that Tenable Network Security has extracted the preceding description block directly from the Ubuntu security advisory. Tenable has attempted to automatically clean and format it as much as possible without introducing additional issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2019-01-02
    plugin id 51643
    published 2011-01-21
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=51643
    title Ubuntu 9.10 / 10.04 LTS / 10.10 : sudo vulnerability (USN-1046-1)
  • NASL family Oracle Linux Local Security Checks
    NASL id ORACLELINUX_ELSA-2012-0309.NASL
    description From Red Hat Security Advisory 2012:0309 : An updated sudo package that fixes one security issue and various bugs is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having low security impact. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which gives a detailed severity rating, is available from the CVE link in the References section. The sudo (superuser do) utility allows system administrators to give certain users the ability to run commands as root. A flaw was found in the sudo password checking logic. In configurations where the sudoers settings allowed a user to run a command using sudo with only the group ID changed, sudo failed to prompt for the user's password before running the specified command with the elevated group privileges. (CVE-2011-0010) In addition, this update fixes the following bugs : * A NULL pointer dereference bug caused the sudo utility to terminate unexpectedly with a segmentation fault. This happened if the utility was run with the -g option and configured not to demand the password from the user who ran the sudo utility. With this update, the code has been modified and the problem no longer occurs. (BZ#673072) * The sudo utility failed to load sudoers from an LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) server after the sudo tool was upgraded. This happened because the upgraded nsswitch.conf file did not contain the instruction to search for sudoers on the LDAP server. This update adds the lost instruction to /etc/nsswitch.conf and the system searches for sources of sudoers on the local file system and then on LDAP, if applicable. (BZ#617061) * The sudo tool interpreted a Runas alias specifying a group incorrectly as a user alias and the alias seemed to be ignored. With this update, the code for interpreting such aliases has been modified and the Runas group aliases are honored as expected. (BZ#627543) * Prior to this update, sudo did not parse comment characters (#) in the ldap.conf file correctly and could fail to work. With this update, parsing of the LDAP configuration file has been modified and the comment characters are parsed correctly. (BZ#750318) * The sudo utility formats its output to fit the width of the terminal window. However, this behavior is undesirable if the output is redirected through a pipeline. With this update, the output formatting is not applied in the scenario described. (BZ#697111) * Previously, the sudo utility performed Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) related initialization after switching to an unprivileged user. This prevented the correct setup of the SELinux environment before executing the specified command and could potentially cause an access denial. The bug has been fixed by backporting the SELinux related code and the execution model from a newer version of sudo. (BZ#477185) * On execv(3) function failure, the sudo tool executed an auditing call before reporting the failure. The call reset the error state and, consequently, the tool incorrectly reported that the command succeeded. With this update, the code has been modified and the problem no longer occurs. (BZ#673157) All users of sudo are advised to upgrade to this updated package, which resolves these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2019-01-02
    plugin id 68480
    published 2013-07-12
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=68480
    title Oracle Linux 5 : sudo (ELSA-2012-0309)
  • NASL family Scientific Linux Local Security Checks
    NASL id SL_20120221_SUDO_ON_SL5_X.NASL
    description The sudo (superuser do) utility allows system administrators to give certain users the ability to run commands as root. A flaw was found in the sudo password checking logic. In configurations where the sudoers settings allowed a user to run a command using sudo with only the group ID changed, sudo failed to prompt for the user's password before running the specified command with the elevated group privileges. (CVE-2011-0010) In addition, this update fixes the following bugs : - A NULL pointer dereference bug caused the sudo utility to terminate unexpectedly with a segmentation fault. This happened if the utility was run with the -g option and configured not to demand the password from the user who ran the sudo utility. With this update, the code has been modified and the problem no longer occurs. - The sudo utility failed to load sudoers from an LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) server after the sudo tool was upgraded. This happened because the upgraded nsswitch.conf file did not contain the instruction to search for sudoers on the LDAP server. This update adds the lost instruction to /etc/nsswitch.conf and the system searches for sources of sudoers on the local file system and then on LDAP, if applicable. - The sudo tool interpreted a Runas alias specifying a group incorrectly as a user alias and the alias seemed to be ignored. With this update, the code for interpreting such aliases has been modified and the Runas group aliases are honored as expected. - Prior to this update, sudo did not parse comment characters (#) in the ldap.conf file correctly and could fail to work. With this update, parsing of the LDAP configuration file has been modified and the comment characters are parsed correctly. - The sudo utility formats its output to fit the width of the terminal window. However, this behavior is undesirable if the output is redirected through a pipeline. With this update, the output formatting is not applied in the scenario described. - Previously, the sudo utility performed Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) related initialization after switching to an unprivileged user. This prevented the correct setup of the SELinux environment before executing the specified command and could potentially cause an access denial. The bug has been fixed by backporting the SELinux related code and the execution model from a newer version of sudo. - On execv(3) function failure, the sudo tool executed an auditing call before reporting the failure. The call reset the error state and, consequently, the tool incorrectly reported that the command succeeded. With this update, the code has been modified and the problem no longer occurs. All users of sudo are advised to upgrade to this updated package, which resolves these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-12-31
    plugin id 61271
    published 2012-08-01
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=61271
    title Scientific Linux Security Update : sudo on SL5.x i386/x86_64
  • NASL family Slackware Local Security Checks
    NASL id SLACKWARE_SSA_2011-041-05.NASL
    description New sudo packages are available for Slackware 8.1, 9.0, 9.1, 10.0, 10.1, 10.2, 11.0, 12.0, 12.1, 12.2, 13.0, 13.1, and -current to fix a security issue.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-06-27
    plugin id 51944
    published 2011-02-11
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=51944
    title Slackware 10.0 / 10.1 / 10.2 / 11.0 / 12.0 / 12.1 / 12.2 / 13.0 / 13.1 / 8.1 / 9.0 / 9.1 / current : sudo (SSA:2011-041-05)
  • NASL family Red Hat Local Security Checks
    NASL id REDHAT-RHSA-2012-0309.NASL
    description An updated sudo package that fixes one security issue and various bugs is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having low security impact. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which gives a detailed severity rating, is available from the CVE link in the References section. The sudo (superuser do) utility allows system administrators to give certain users the ability to run commands as root. A flaw was found in the sudo password checking logic. In configurations where the sudoers settings allowed a user to run a command using sudo with only the group ID changed, sudo failed to prompt for the user's password before running the specified command with the elevated group privileges. (CVE-2011-0010) In addition, this update fixes the following bugs : * A NULL pointer dereference bug caused the sudo utility to terminate unexpectedly with a segmentation fault. This happened if the utility was run with the -g option and configured not to demand the password from the user who ran the sudo utility. With this update, the code has been modified and the problem no longer occurs. (BZ#673072) * The sudo utility failed to load sudoers from an LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) server after the sudo tool was upgraded. This happened because the upgraded nsswitch.conf file did not contain the instruction to search for sudoers on the LDAP server. This update adds the lost instruction to /etc/nsswitch.conf and the system searches for sources of sudoers on the local file system and then on LDAP, if applicable. (BZ#617061) * The sudo tool interpreted a Runas alias specifying a group incorrectly as a user alias and the alias seemed to be ignored. With this update, the code for interpreting such aliases has been modified and the Runas group aliases are honored as expected. (BZ#627543) * Prior to this update, sudo did not parse comment characters (#) in the ldap.conf file correctly and could fail to work. With this update, parsing of the LDAP configuration file has been modified and the comment characters are parsed correctly. (BZ#750318) * The sudo utility formats its output to fit the width of the terminal window. However, this behavior is undesirable if the output is redirected through a pipeline. With this update, the output formatting is not applied in the scenario described. (BZ#697111) * Previously, the sudo utility performed Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) related initialization after switching to an unprivileged user. This prevented the correct setup of the SELinux environment before executing the specified command and could potentially cause an access denial. The bug has been fixed by backporting the SELinux related code and the execution model from a newer version of sudo. (BZ#477185) * On execv(3) function failure, the sudo tool executed an auditing call before reporting the failure. The call reset the error state and, consequently, the tool incorrectly reported that the command succeeded. With this update, the code has been modified and the problem no longer occurs. (BZ#673157) All users of sudo are advised to upgrade to this updated package, which resolves these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-26
    plugin id 58063
    published 2012-02-21
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=58063
    title RHEL 5 : sudo (RHSA-2012:0309)
  • NASL family SuSE Local Security Checks
    NASL id SUSE_11_3_SUDO-110114.NASL
    description This update of sudo fixes : - CVE-2011-0010: Does ask for the user password for GID changes now. - CVE-2010-1646: CVSS v2 Base Score: 6.6 (CWE-264): The secure environment option can handle multiple occurrence of PATH now. - CVE-2010-1163: CVSS v2 Base Score: 6.9 (CWE-20): Improved command matching.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-10
    plugin id 75751
    published 2014-06-13
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=75751
    title openSUSE Security Update : sudo (openSUSE-SU-2011:0050-1)
  • NASL family Mandriva Local Security Checks
    NASL id MANDRIVA_MDVSA-2011-018.NASL
    description Multiple vulnerabilities has been found and corrected in sudo : A a patch for parse.c in sudo does not properly interpret a system group (aka %group) in the sudoers file during authorization decisions for a user who belongs to that group, which allows local users to leverage an applicable sudoers file and gain root privileges via a sudo command. NOTE: this vulnerability exists because of a CVE-2009-0034 regression (CVE-2011-0008). check.c in sudo 1.7.x before 1.7.4p5, when a Runas group is configured, does not require a password for command execution that involves a gid change but no uid change, which allows local users to bypass an intended authentication requirement via the -g option to a sudo command (CVE-2011-0010). Packages for 2009.0 are provided as of the Extended Maintenance Program. Please visit this link to learn more: http://store.mandriva.com/product_info.php?cPath=149 products_id=490 The updated packages have been upgraded to the latest versions (1.7.4p6) which is not affected by these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-07-19
    plugin id 51809
    published 2011-01-28
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=51809
    title Mandriva Linux Security Advisory : sudo (MDVSA-2011:018)
  • NASL family SuSE Local Security Checks
    NASL id SUSE_11_2_SUDO-110114.NASL
    description This update of sudo fixes : - CVE-2011-0010: Does ask for the user password for GID changes now. - CVE-2010-1646: CVSS v2 Base Score: 6.6 (CWE-264): The secure environment option can handle multiple occurrence of PATH now. - CVE-2010-1163: CVSS v2 Base Score: 6.9 (CWE-20): Improved command matching.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-10
    plugin id 53801
    published 2011-05-05
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=53801
    title openSUSE Security Update : sudo (openSUSE-SU-2011:0050-1)
  • NASL family Gentoo Local Security Checks
    NASL id GENTOO_GLSA-201203-06.NASL
    description The remote host is affected by the vulnerability described in GLSA-201203-06 (sudo: Privilege escalation) Two vulnerabilities have been discovered in sudo: When the sudoers file is configured with a Runas group, sudo does not prompt for a password when changing to the new group (CVE-2011-0010). A format string vulnerability exists in the 'sudo_debug()' function (CVE-2012-0809). Impact : A local attacker could possibly gain the ability to run arbitrary commands with the privileges of other users or groups, including root. Workaround : There is no known workaround at this time.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2016-09-13
    plugin id 58216
    published 2012-03-06
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=58216
    title GLSA-201203-06 : sudo: Privilege escalation
  • NASL family Fedora Local Security Checks
    NASL id FEDORA_2011-0455.NASL
    description - rebase to 1.7.4p5 - fixed sudo-1.7.4p4-getgrouplist.patch - fixes CVE-2011-0008, CVE-2011-0010 Note that Tenable Network Security has extracted the preceding description block directly from the Fedora security advisory. Tenable has attempted to automatically clean and format it as much as possible without introducing additional issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2015-10-20
    plugin id 51656
    published 2011-01-24
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=51656
    title Fedora 13 : sudo-1.7.4p5-1.fc13 (2011-0455)
  • NASL family Fedora Local Security Checks
    NASL id FEDORA_2011-0470.NASL
    description - rebase to 1.7.4p5 - fixed sudo-1.7.4p4-getgrouplist.patch - fixes CVE-2011-0008, CVE-2011-0010 Note that Tenable Network Security has extracted the preceding description block directly from the Fedora security advisory. Tenable has attempted to automatically clean and format it as much as possible without introducing additional issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-07-12
    plugin id 51566
    published 2011-01-19
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=51566
    title Fedora 14 : sudo-1.7.4p5-1.fc14 (2011-0470)
redhat via4
advisories
  • bugzilla
    id 688640
    title Add comment about the visiblepw option into sudoers
    oval
    AND
    • comment sudo is earlier than 0:1.7.4p5-5.el6
      oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20110599005
    • comment sudo is signed with Red Hat redhatrelease2 key
      oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20110599006
    • OR
      • comment Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Client is installed
        oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20100842001
      • comment Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Server is installed
        oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20100842002
      • comment Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Workstation is installed
        oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20100842003
      • comment Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 ComputeNode is installed
        oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20100842004
    rhsa
    id RHSA-2011:0599
    released 2011-05-19
    severity Low
    title RHSA-2011:0599: sudo security and bug fix update (Low)
  • bugzilla
    id 697111
    title sudo -l inserts new lines based on terminal width, causing errors when output is piped.
    oval
    AND
    • comment Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 is installed
      oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20070055001
    • comment sudo is earlier than 0:1.7.2p1-13.el5
      oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20120309002
    • comment sudo is signed with Red Hat redhatrelease key
      oval oval:com.redhat.rhsa:tst:20090267003
    rhsa
    id RHSA-2012:0309
    released 2012-02-21
    severity Low
    title RHSA-2012:0309: sudo security and bug fix update (Low)
rpms
  • sudo-0:1.7.4p5-5.el6
  • sudo-0:1.7.2p1-13.el5
refmap via4
bid 45774
confirm
fedora
  • FEDORA-2011-0455
  • FEDORA-2011-0470
gentoo GLSA-201203-06
mandriva MDVSA-2011:018
misc http://www.sudo.ws/repos/sudo/rev/07d1b0ce530e
mlist
  • [oss-security] 20110111 CVE request: sudo does not ask for password on GID changes
  • [oss-security] 20110112 Re: CVE request: sudo does not ask for password on GID changes
osvdb 70400
secunia
  • 42886
  • 42949
  • 42968
  • 43068
  • 43282
slackware SSA:2011-041-05
suse SUSE-SR:2011:002
ubuntu USN-1046-1
vupen
  • ADV-2011-0089
  • ADV-2011-0182
  • ADV-2011-0195
  • ADV-2011-0199
  • ADV-2011-0212
  • ADV-2011-0362
xf sudo-groupid-privilege-escalation(64636)
Last major update 26-08-2011 - 23:46
Published 18-01-2011 - 13:03
Last modified 04-01-2018 - 21:29
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