ID CVE-2004-0175
Summary Directory traversal vulnerability in scp for OpenSSH before 3.4p1 allows remote malicious servers to overwrite arbitrary files. NOTE: this may be a rediscovery of CVE-2000-0992.
References
Vulnerable Configurations
  • OpenBSD OpenSSH 3.0
    cpe:2.3:a:openbsd:openssh:3.0
  • OpenBSD OpenSSH 3.0.1
    cpe:2.3:a:openbsd:openssh:3.0.1
  • OpenBSD OpenSSH 3.0.1 p1
    cpe:2.3:a:openbsd:openssh:3.0.1p1
  • OpenBSD OpenSSH 3.0.2
    cpe:2.3:a:openbsd:openssh:3.0.2
  • OpenBSD OpenSSH 3.0.2p1
    cpe:2.3:a:openbsd:openssh:3.0.2p1
  • OpenBSD OpenSSH 3.0 p1
    cpe:2.3:a:openbsd:openssh:3.0p1
  • OpenBSD OpenSSH 3.1
    cpe:2.3:a:openbsd:openssh:3.1
  • OpenBSD OpenSSH 3.1 p1
    cpe:2.3:a:openbsd:openssh:3.1p1
  • OpenBSD OpenSSH 3.2
    cpe:2.3:a:openbsd:openssh:3.2
  • OpenBSD OpenSSH 3.2.2 p1
    cpe:2.3:a:openbsd:openssh:3.2.2p1
  • OpenBSD OpenSSH 3.2.3 p1
    cpe:2.3:a:openbsd:openssh:3.2.3p1
  • OpenBSD OpenSSH 3.3
    cpe:2.3:a:openbsd:openssh:3.3
  • OpenBSD OpenSSH 3.3 p1
    cpe:2.3:a:openbsd:openssh:3.3p1
  • OpenBSD OpenSSH 3.4
    cpe:2.3:a:openbsd:openssh:3.4
  • OpenBSD OpenSSH 3.4 p1
    cpe:2.3:a:openbsd:openssh:3.4p1
CVSS
Base: 4.3 (as of 01-01-2004 - 00:00)
Impact:
Exploitability:
CWE CWE-22
CAPEC
  • Relative Path Traversal
    An attacker exploits a weakness in input validation on the target by supplying a specially constructed path utilizing dot and slash characters for the purpose of obtaining access to arbitrary files or resources. An attacker modifies a known path on the target in order to reach material that is not available through intended channels. These attacks normally involve adding additional path separators (/ or \) and/or dots (.), or encodings thereof, in various combinations in order to reach parent directories or entirely separate trees of the target's directory structure.
  • Directory Traversal
    An attacker with access to file system resources, either directly or via application logic, will use various file path specification or navigation mechanisms such as ".." in path strings and absolute paths to extend their range of access to inappropriate areas of the file system. The attacker attempts to either explore the file system for recon purposes or access directories and files that are intended to be restricted from their access. Exploring the file system can be achieved through constructing paths presented to directory listing programs, such as "ls" and 'dir', or through specially crafted programs that attempt to explore the file system. The attacker engaging in this type of activity is searching for information that can be used later in a more exploitive attack. Access to restricted directories or files can be achieved through modification of path references utilized by system applications.
  • File System Function Injection, Content Based
    An attack of this type exploits the host's trust in executing remote content including binary files. The files are poisoned with a malicious payload (targeting the file systems accessible by the target software) by the attacker and may be passed through standard channels such as via email, and standard web content like PDF and multimedia files. The attacker exploits known vulnerabilities or handling routines in the target processes. Vulnerabilities of this type have been found in a wide variety of commercial applications from Microsoft Office to Adobe Acrobat and Apple Safari web browser. When the attacker knows the standard handling routines and can identify vulnerabilities and entry points they can be exploited by otherwise seemingly normal content. Once the attack is executed, the attackers' program can access relative directories such as C:\Program Files or other standard system directories to launch further attacks. In a worst case scenario, these programs are combined with other propagation logic and work as a virus.
  • Using Slashes and URL Encoding Combined to Bypass Validation Logic
    This attack targets the encoding of the URL combined with the encoding of the slash characters. An attacker can take advantage of the multiple way of encoding an URL and abuse the interpretation of the URL. An URL may contain special character that need special syntax handling in order to be interpreted. Special characters are represented using a percentage character followed by two digits representing the octet code of the original character (%HEX-CODE). For instance US-ASCII space character would be represented with %20. This is often referred as escaped ending or percent-encoding. Since the server decodes the URL from the requests, it may restrict the access to some URL paths by validating and filtering out the URL requests it received. An attacker will try to craft an URL with a sequence of special characters which once interpreted by the server will be equivalent to a forbidden URL. It can be difficult to protect against this attack since the URL can contain other format of encoding such as UTF-8 encoding, Unicode-encoding, etc.
  • Manipulating Input to File System Calls
    An attacker manipulates inputs to the target software which the target software passes to file system calls in the OS. The goal is to gain access to, and perhaps modify, areas of the file system that the target software did not intend to be accessible.
  • Using Escaped Slashes in Alternate Encoding
    This attack targets the use of the backslash in alternate encoding. An attacker can provide a backslash as a leading character and causes a parser to believe that the next character is special. This is called an escape. By using that trick, the attacker tries to exploit alternate ways to encode the same character which leads to filter problems and opens avenues to attack.
  • Using Slashes in Alternate Encoding
    This attack targets the encoding of the Slash characters. An attacker would try to exploit common filtering problems related to the use of the slashes characters to gain access to resources on the target host. Directory-driven systems, such as file systems and databases, typically use the slash character to indicate traversal between directories or other container components. For murky historical reasons, PCs (and, as a result, Microsoft OSs) choose to use a backslash, whereas the UNIX world typically makes use of the forward slash. The schizophrenic result is that many MS-based systems are required to understand both forms of the slash. This gives the attacker many opportunities to discover and abuse a number of common filtering problems. The goal of this pattern is to discover server software that only applies filters to one version, but not the other.
Access
VectorComplexityAuthentication
NETWORK MEDIUM NONE
Impact
ConfidentialityIntegrityAvailability
NONE PARTIAL NONE
nessus via4
  • NASL family Red Hat Local Security Checks
    NASL id REDHAT-RHSA-2005-481.NASL
    description Updated openssh packages that fix a potential security vulnerability and various other bugs are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1. This update has been rated as having low security impact by the Red Hat Security Response Team. OpenSSH is OpenBSD's SSH (Secure SHell) protocol implementation. SSH replaces rlogin and rsh, and provides secure encrypted communications between two untrusted hosts over an insecure network. X11 connections and arbitrary TCP/IP ports can also be forwarded over a secure channel. Public key authentication can be used for 'passwordless' access to servers. The scp protocol allows a server to instruct a client to write to arbitrary files outside of the current directory. This could potentially cause a security issue if a user uses scp to copy files from a malicious server. The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures project (cve.mitre.org) has assigned the name CVE-2004-0175 to this issue. These updated packages also correct the following bug : On systems in which direct ssh access for the root user was disabled by configuration (setting 'PermitRootLogin no'), attempts to guess the root password could be judged as sucessful or unsucessful by observing a delay. Users of openssh should upgrade to these updated packages, which contain backported patches to resolve these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-15
    plugin id 18423
    published 2005-06-06
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=18423
    title RHEL 2.1 : openssh (RHSA-2005:481)
  • NASL family Red Hat Local Security Checks
    NASL id REDHAT-RHSA-2005-106.NASL
    description Updated openssh packages that fix a potential security vulnerability and various other bugs are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3. This update has been rated as having low security impact by the Red Hat Security Response Team. OpenSSH is OpenBSD's SSH (Secure SHell) protocol implementation. SSH replaces rlogin and rsh, and provides secure encrypted communications between two untrusted hosts over an insecure network. X11 connections and arbitrary TCP/IP ports can also be forwarded over a secure channel. Public key authentication can be used for 'passwordless' access to servers. The scp protocol allows a server to instruct a client to write to arbitrary files outside of the current directory. This could potentially cause a security issue if a user uses scp to copy files from a malicious server. The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures project (cve.mitre.org) has assigned the name CVE-2004-0175 to this issue. These updated packages also correct the following bugs : On systems where direct ssh access for the root user was disabled by configuration (setting 'PermitRootLogin no'), attempts to guess the root password could be judged as sucessful or unsucessful by observing a delay. On systems where the privilege separation feature was turned on, the user resource limits were not correctly set if the configuration specified to raise them above the defaults. It was also not possible to change an expired password. Users of openssh should upgrade to these updated packages, which contain backported patches to resolve these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-15
    plugin id 18310
    published 2005-05-19
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=18310
    title RHEL 3 : openssh (RHSA-2005:106)
  • NASL family Red Hat Local Security Checks
    NASL id REDHAT-RHSA-2005-495.NASL
    description Updated rsh packages that fix a theoretical security issue are now available. This update has been rated as having low security impact by the Red Hat Security Response Team The rsh package contains a set of programs that allow users to run commands on remote machines, login to other machines, and copy files between machines, using the rsh, rlogin, and rcp commands. All three of these commands use rhosts-style authentication. The rcp protocol allows a server to instruct a client to write to arbitrary files outside of the current directory. This could potentially cause a security issue if a user uses rcp to copy files from a malicious server. The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures project (cve.mitre.org) has assigned the name CVE-2004-0175 to this issue. All users of rsh should upgrade to these updated packages, which resolve these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-15
    plugin id 18472
    published 2005-06-13
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=18472
    title RHEL 2.1 : rsh (RHSA-2005:495)
  • NASL family CentOS Local Security Checks
    NASL id CENTOS_RHSA-2005-165.NASL
    description Updated rsh packages that fix various bugs and a theoretical security issue are now available. This update has been rated as having low security impact by the Red Hat Security Response Team The rsh package contains a set of programs that allow users to run commands on remote machines, login to other machines, and copy files between machines, using the rsh, rlogin, and rcp commands. All three of these commands use rhosts-style authentication. The rcp protocol allows a server to instruct a client to write to arbitrary files outside of the current directory. This could potentially cause a security issue if a user uses rcp to copy files from a malicious server. The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures project (cve.mitre.org) has assigned the name CVE-2004-0175 to this issue. These updated packages also address the following bugs : The rlogind server reported 'SIGCHLD set to SIG_IGN but calls wait()' message to the system log because the original BSD code was ported incorrectly to linux. The rexecd server did not function on systems where client hostnames were not in the DNS service, because server code called gethostbyaddr() for each new connection. The rcp command incorrectly used the 'errno' variable and produced erroneous error messages. The rexecd command ignored settings in the /etc/security/limits file, because the PAM session was incorrectly initialized. All users of rsh should upgrade to these updated packages, which resolve these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-10
    plugin id 21920
    published 2006-07-05
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=21920
    title CentOS 4 : rsh (CESA-2005:165)
  • NASL family Red Hat Local Security Checks
    NASL id REDHAT-RHSA-2005-074.NASL
    description Updated rsh packages that fix various bugs and a theoretical security issue are now available. This update has been rated as having low security impact by the Red Hat Security Response Team The rsh package contains a set of programs that allow users to run commands on remote machines, login to other machines, and copy files between machines, using the rsh, rlogin, and rcp commands. All three of these commands use rhosts-style authentication. The rcp protocol allows a server to instruct a client to write to arbitrary files outside of the current directory. This could potentially cause a security issue if a user uses rcp to copy files from a malicious server. The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures project (cve.mitre.org) has assigned the name CVE-2004-0175 to this issue. These updated packages also address the following bugs : The rexec command failed with 'Invalid Argument', because the code used sigaction() as an unsupported signal. The rlogind server reported 'SIGCHLD set to SIG_IGN but calls wait()' message to the system log because the original BSD code was ported incorrectly to linux. The rexecd server did not function on systems where client hostnames were not in the DNS service, because server code called gethostbyaddr() for each new connection. The rcp command incorrectly used the 'errno' variable and produced erroneous error messages. The rexecd command ignored settings in the /etc/security/limits file, because the PAM session was incorrectly initialized. The rexec command prompted for username and password regardless of the ~/.netrc configuration file contents. This updated package contains a patch that no longer skips the ~/.netrc file. All users of rsh should upgrade to these updated packages, which resolve these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-15
    plugin id 18309
    published 2005-05-19
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=18309
    title RHEL 3 : rsh (RHSA-2005:074)
  • NASL family CentOS Local Security Checks
    NASL id CENTOS_RHSA-2005-567.NASL
    description Updated krb5 packages that fix multiple security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4. This update has been rated as having important security impact by the Red Hat Security Response Team. Kerberos is a networked authentication system that uses a trusted third party (a KDC) to authenticate clients and servers to each other. A double-free flaw was found in the krb5_recvauth() routine which may be triggered by a remote unauthenticated attacker. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 contains checks within glibc that detect double-free flaws. Therefore, on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 successful exploitation of this issue can only lead to a denial of service (KDC crash). The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures project assigned the name CVE-2005-1689 to this issue. Daniel Wachdorf discovered a single byte heap overflow in the krb5_unparse_name() function, part of krb5-libs. Sucessful exploitation of this flaw would lead to a denial of service (crash). To trigger this flaw an attacker would need to have control of a kerberos realm that shares a cross-realm key with the target, making exploitation of this flaw unlikely. (CVE-2005-1175). Daniel Wachdorf also discovered that in error conditions that may occur in response to correctly-formatted client requests, the Kerberos 5 KDC may attempt to free uninitialized memory. This could allow a remote attacker to cause a denial of service (KDC crash) (CVE-2005-1174). Gael Delalleau discovered an information disclosure issue in the way some telnet clients handle messages from a server. An attacker could construct a malicious telnet server that collects information from the environment of any victim who connects to it using the Kerberos-aware telnet client (CVE-2005-0488). The rcp protocol allows a server to instruct a client to write to arbitrary files outside of the current directory. This could potentially cause a security issue if a user uses the Kerberos-aware rcp to copy files from a malicious server (CVE-2004-0175). All users of krb5 should update to these erratum packages, which contain backported patches to correct these issues. Red Hat would like to thank the MIT Kerberos Development Team for their responsible disclosure of these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-10
    plugin id 21946
    published 2006-07-05
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=21946
    title CentOS 4 : krb5 (CESA-2005:567)
  • NASL family Red Hat Local Security Checks
    NASL id REDHAT-RHSA-2005-567.NASL
    description Updated krb5 packages that fix multiple security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4. This update has been rated as having important security impact by the Red Hat Security Response Team. Kerberos is a networked authentication system that uses a trusted third party (a KDC) to authenticate clients and servers to each other. A double-free flaw was found in the krb5_recvauth() routine which may be triggered by a remote unauthenticated attacker. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 contains checks within glibc that detect double-free flaws. Therefore, on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 successful exploitation of this issue can only lead to a denial of service (KDC crash). The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures project assigned the name CVE-2005-1689 to this issue. Daniel Wachdorf discovered a single byte heap overflow in the krb5_unparse_name() function, part of krb5-libs. Sucessful exploitation of this flaw would lead to a denial of service (crash). To trigger this flaw an attacker would need to have control of a kerberos realm that shares a cross-realm key with the target, making exploitation of this flaw unlikely. (CVE-2005-1175). Daniel Wachdorf also discovered that in error conditions that may occur in response to correctly-formatted client requests, the Kerberos 5 KDC may attempt to free uninitialized memory. This could allow a remote attacker to cause a denial of service (KDC crash) (CVE-2005-1174). Gael Delalleau discovered an information disclosure issue in the way some telnet clients handle messages from a server. An attacker could construct a malicious telnet server that collects information from the environment of any victim who connects to it using the Kerberos-aware telnet client (CVE-2005-0488). The rcp protocol allows a server to instruct a client to write to arbitrary files outside of the current directory. This could potentially cause a security issue if a user uses the Kerberos-aware rcp to copy files from a malicious server (CVE-2004-0175). All users of krb5 should update to these erratum packages, which contain backported patches to correct these issues. Red Hat would like to thank the MIT Kerberos Development Team for their responsible disclosure of these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-15
    plugin id 18688
    published 2005-07-13
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=18688
    title RHEL 4 : krb5 (RHSA-2005:567)
  • NASL family Red Hat Local Security Checks
    NASL id REDHAT-RHSA-2005-165.NASL
    description Updated rsh packages that fix various bugs and a theoretical security issue are now available. This update has been rated as having low security impact by the Red Hat Security Response Team The rsh package contains a set of programs that allow users to run commands on remote machines, login to other machines, and copy files between machines, using the rsh, rlogin, and rcp commands. All three of these commands use rhosts-style authentication. The rcp protocol allows a server to instruct a client to write to arbitrary files outside of the current directory. This could potentially cause a security issue if a user uses rcp to copy files from a malicious server. The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures project (cve.mitre.org) has assigned the name CVE-2004-0175 to this issue. These updated packages also address the following bugs : The rlogind server reported 'SIGCHLD set to SIG_IGN but calls wait()' message to the system log because the original BSD code was ported incorrectly to linux. The rexecd server did not function on systems where client hostnames were not in the DNS service, because server code called gethostbyaddr() for each new connection. The rcp command incorrectly used the 'errno' variable and produced erroneous error messages. The rexecd command ignored settings in the /etc/security/limits file, because the PAM session was incorrectly initialized. All users of rsh should upgrade to these updated packages, which resolve these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-15
    plugin id 18442
    published 2005-06-10
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=18442
    title RHEL 4 : rsh (RHSA-2005:165)
  • NASL family CentOS Local Security Checks
    NASL id CENTOS_RHSA-2005-106.NASL
    description Updated openssh packages that fix a potential security vulnerability and various other bugs are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3. This update has been rated as having low security impact by the Red Hat Security Response Team. OpenSSH is OpenBSD's SSH (Secure SHell) protocol implementation. SSH replaces rlogin and rsh, and provides secure encrypted communications between two untrusted hosts over an insecure network. X11 connections and arbitrary TCP/IP ports can also be forwarded over a secure channel. Public key authentication can be used for 'passwordless' access to servers. The scp protocol allows a server to instruct a client to write to arbitrary files outside of the current directory. This could potentially cause a security issue if a user uses scp to copy files from a malicious server. The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures project (cve.mitre.org) has assigned the name CVE-2004-0175 to this issue. These updated packages also correct the following bugs : On systems where direct ssh access for the root user was disabled by configuration (setting 'PermitRootLogin no'), attempts to guess the root password could be judged as sucessful or unsucessful by observing a delay. On systems where the privilege separation feature was turned on, the user resource limits were not correctly set if the configuration specified to raise them above the defaults. It was also not possible to change an expired password. Users of openssh should upgrade to these updated packages, which contain backported patches to resolve these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-10
    plugin id 21798
    published 2006-07-03
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=21798
    title CentOS 3 : openssh (CESA-2005:106)
  • NASL family Misc.
    NASL id OPENSSH_34P1.NASL
    description According to its banner, the version of OpenSSH running on the remote host is earlier than version 3.4p1. Such versions contain an arbitrary file overwrite vulnerability that could allow a malicious SSH server to cause the supplied scp utility to write to arbitrary files outside of the current directory.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-07-16
    plugin id 17701
    published 2011-11-18
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=17701
    title OpenSSH < 3.4p1 scp Traversal Arbitrary File Overwrite
  • NASL family Mandriva Local Security Checks
    NASL id MANDRAKE_MDKSA-2005-100.NASL
    description A vulnerability in the rcp protocol was discovered that allows a server to instruct a client to write arbitrary files outside of the current directory, which could potentially be a security concern if a user used rcp to copy files from a malicious server. The updated packages have been patched to correct this problem.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-07-19
    plugin id 18497
    published 2005-06-16
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=18497
    title Mandrake Linux Security Advisory : rsh (MDKSA-2005:100)
  • NASL family Mandriva Local Security Checks
    NASL id MANDRIVA_MDVSA-2008-191.NASL
    description A vulnerability in the rcp protocol was discovered that allows a server to instruct a client to write arbitrary files outside of the current directory, which could potentially be a security concern if a user used rcp to copy files from a malicious server (CVE-2004-0175). This issue was originally corrected in MDKSA-2005:100, but the patch had not been applied to the development tree, so released packages after that date did not have the fix applied. This update also corrects an issue where rexecd did not honor settings in /etc/security/limits if pam_limits was in use.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-07-19
    plugin id 36260
    published 2009-04-23
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=36260
    title Mandriva Linux Security Advisory : rsh (MDVSA-2008:191)
  • NASL family CentOS Local Security Checks
    NASL id CENTOS_RHSA-2005-074.NASL
    description Updated rsh packages that fix various bugs and a theoretical security issue are now available. This update has been rated as having low security impact by the Red Hat Security Response Team The rsh package contains a set of programs that allow users to run commands on remote machines, login to other machines, and copy files between machines, using the rsh, rlogin, and rcp commands. All three of these commands use rhosts-style authentication. The rcp protocol allows a server to instruct a client to write to arbitrary files outside of the current directory. This could potentially cause a security issue if a user uses rcp to copy files from a malicious server. The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures project (cve.mitre.org) has assigned the name CVE-2004-0175 to this issue. These updated packages also address the following bugs : The rexec command failed with 'Invalid Argument', because the code used sigaction() as an unsupported signal. The rlogind server reported 'SIGCHLD set to SIG_IGN but calls wait()' message to the system log because the original BSD code was ported incorrectly to linux. The rexecd server did not function on systems where client hostnames were not in the DNS service, because server code called gethostbyaddr() for each new connection. The rcp command incorrectly used the 'errno' variable and produced erroneous error messages. The rexecd command ignored settings in the /etc/security/limits file, because the PAM session was incorrectly initialized. The rexec command prompted for username and password regardless of the ~/.netrc configuration file contents. This updated package contains a patch that no longer skips the ~/.netrc file. All users of rsh should upgrade to these updated packages, which resolve these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-10
    plugin id 21796
    published 2006-07-03
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=21796
    title CentOS 3 : rsh (CESA-2005:074)
  • NASL family Red Hat Local Security Checks
    NASL id REDHAT-RHSA-2005-562.NASL
    description Updated krb5 packages which fix multiple security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1 and 3. This update has been rated as having critical security impact by the Red Hat Security Response Team. [Updated 26 Sep 2005] krb5-server packages have been added to this advisory for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 WS and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 Desktop. Kerberos is a networked authentication system which uses a trusted third party (a KDC) to authenticate clients and servers to each other. A double-free flaw was found in the krb5_recvauth() routine which may be triggered by a remote unauthenticated attacker. Although no exploit is currently known to exist, this issue could potentially be exploited to allow arbitrary code execution on a Key Distribution Center (KDC). The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures project assigned the name CVE-2005-1689 to this issue. Daniel Wachdorf discovered a single byte heap overflow in the krb5_unparse_name() function, part of krb5-libs. Sucessful exploitation of this flaw would lead to a denial of service (crash). To trigger this flaw an attacker would need to have control of a kerberos realm that shares a cross-realm key with the target, making exploitation of this flaw unlikely. (CVE-2005-1175). Gael Delalleau discovered an information disclosure issue in the way some telnet clients handle messages from a server. An attacker could construct a malicious telnet server that collects information from the environment of any victim who connects to it using the Kerberos-aware telnet client (CVE-2005-0488). The rcp protocol allows a server to instruct a client to write to arbitrary files outside of the current directory. This could potentially cause a security issue if a user uses the Kerberos-aware rcp to copy files from a malicious server (CVE-2004-0175). All users of krb5 should update to these erratum packages which contain backported patches to correct these issues. Red Hat would like to thank the MIT Kerberos Development Team for their responsible disclosure of these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-15
    plugin id 18687
    published 2005-07-13
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=18687
    title RHEL 2.1 / 3 : krb5 (RHSA-2005:562)
  • NASL family MacOS X Local Security Checks
    NASL id MACOSX_SECUPD20040907.NASL
    description The remote host is missing Security Update 2004-09-07. This security update fixes the following components : - CoreFoundation - IPSec - Kerberos - libpcap - lukemftpd - NetworkConfig - OpenLDAP - OpenSSH - PPPDialer - rsync - Safari - tcpdump These applications contain multiple vulnerabilities that may allow a remote attacker to execute arbitrary code.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-07-14
    plugin id 14676
    published 2004-09-08
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=14676
    title Mac OS X Multiple Vulnerabilities (Security Update 2004-09-07)
  • NASL family Misc.
    NASL id SUNSSH_PLAINTEXT_RECOVERY.NASL
    description The version of SunSSH running on the remote host has an information disclosure vulnerability. A design flaw in the SSH specification could allow a man-in-the-middle attacker to recover up to 32 bits of plaintext from an SSH-protected connection in the standard configuration. An attacker could exploit this to gain access to sensitive information. Note that this version of SunSSH is also prone to several additional issues but Nessus did not test for them.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-07-31
    plugin id 55992
    published 2011-08-29
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=55992
    title SunSSH < 1.1.1 / 1.3 CBC Plaintext Disclosure
  • NASL family Mandriva Local Security Checks
    NASL id MANDRAKE_MDKSA-2005-119.NASL
    description A number of vulnerabilities have been corrected in this Kerberos update : The rcp protocol would allow a server to instruct a client to write to arbitrary files outside of the current directory. The Kerberos-aware rcp could be abused to copy files from a malicious server (CVE-2004-0175). Gael Delalleau discovered an information disclosure vulnerability in the way some telnet clients handled messages from a server. This could be abused by a malicious telnet server to collect information from the environment of any victim connecting to the server using the Kerberos- aware telnet client (CVE-2005-0488). Daniel Wachdorf disovered that in error conditions that could occur in response to correctly-formatted client requests, the Kerberos 5 KDC may attempt to free uninitialized memory, which could cause the KDC to crash resulting in a Denial of Service (CVE-2005-1174). Daniel Wachdorf also discovered a single-byte heap overflow in the krb5_unparse_name() function that could, if successfully exploited, lead to a crash, resulting in a DoS. To trigger this flaw, an attacker would need to have control of a Kerberos realm that shares a cross- realm key with the target (CVE-2005-1175). Finally, a double-free flaw was discovered in the krb5_recvauth() routine which could be triggered by a remote unauthenticated attacker. This issue could potentially be exploited to allow for the execution of arbitrary code on a KDC. No exploit is currently known to exist (CVE-2005-1689). The updated packages have been patched to address this issue and Mandriva urges all users to upgrade to these packages as quickly as possible.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-07-19
    plugin id 19201
    published 2005-07-14
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=19201
    title Mandrake Linux Security Advisory : krb5 (MDKSA-2005:119)
  • NASL family CentOS Local Security Checks
    NASL id CENTOS_RHSA-2005-562.NASL
    description Updated krb5 packages which fix multiple security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1 and 3. This update has been rated as having critical security impact by the Red Hat Security Response Team. [Updated 26 Sep 2005] krb5-server packages have been added to this advisory for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 WS and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 Desktop. Kerberos is a networked authentication system which uses a trusted third party (a KDC) to authenticate clients and servers to each other. A double-free flaw was found in the krb5_recvauth() routine which may be triggered by a remote unauthenticated attacker. Although no exploit is currently known to exist, this issue could potentially be exploited to allow arbitrary code execution on a Key Distribution Center (KDC). The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures project assigned the name CVE-2005-1689 to this issue. Daniel Wachdorf discovered a single byte heap overflow in the krb5_unparse_name() function, part of krb5-libs. Sucessful exploitation of this flaw would lead to a denial of service (crash). To trigger this flaw an attacker would need to have control of a kerberos realm that shares a cross-realm key with the target, making exploitation of this flaw unlikely. (CVE-2005-1175). Gael Delalleau discovered an information disclosure issue in the way some telnet clients handle messages from a server. An attacker could construct a malicious telnet server that collects information from the environment of any victim who connects to it using the Kerberos-aware telnet client (CVE-2005-0488). The rcp protocol allows a server to instruct a client to write to arbitrary files outside of the current directory. This could potentially cause a security issue if a user uses the Kerberos-aware rcp to copy files from a malicious server (CVE-2004-0175). All users of krb5 should update to these erratum packages which contain backported patches to correct these issues. Red Hat would like to thank the MIT Kerberos Development Team for their responsible disclosure of these issues.
    last seen 2019-02-21
    modified 2018-11-10
    plugin id 21840
    published 2006-07-03
    reporter Tenable
    source https://www.tenable.com/plugins/index.php?view=single&id=21840
    title CentOS 3 : krb5 (CESA-2005:562)
oval via4
accepted 2013-04-29T04:02:59.598-04:00
class vulnerability
contributors
  • name Aharon Chernin
    organization SCAP.com, LLC
  • name Dragos Prisaca
    organization G2, Inc.
definition_extensions
  • comment The operating system installed on the system is Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3
    oval oval:org.mitre.oval:def:11782
  • comment CentOS Linux 3.x
    oval oval:org.mitre.oval:def:16651
  • comment The operating system installed on the system is Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4
    oval oval:org.mitre.oval:def:11831
  • comment CentOS Linux 4.x
    oval oval:org.mitre.oval:def:16636
  • comment Oracle Linux 4.x
    oval oval:org.mitre.oval:def:15990
description Directory traversal vulnerability in scp for OpenSSH before 3.4p1 allows remote malicious servers to overwrite arbitrary files. NOTE: this may be a rediscovery of CVE-2000-0992.
family unix
id oval:org.mitre.oval:def:10184
status accepted
submitted 2010-07-09T03:56:16-04:00
title Directory traversal vulnerability in scp for OpenSSH before 3.4p1 allows remote malicious servers to overwrite arbitrary files. NOTE: this may be a rediscovery of CVE-2000-0992.
version 24
redhat via4
advisories
  • rhsa
    id RHSA-2005:074
  • rhsa
    id RHSA-2005:106
  • rhsa
    id RHSA-2005:165
  • rhsa
    id RHSA-2005:481
  • rhsa
    id RHSA-2005:495
  • rhsa
    id RHSA-2005:562
  • rhsa
    id RHSA-2005:567
refmap via4
bid 9986
ciac O-212
conectiva CLSA-2004:831
confirm
mandriva
  • MDKSA-2005:100
  • MDVSA-2008:191
osvdb 9550
sco SCOSA-2006.11
secunia
  • 17135
  • 19243
suse SuSE-SA:2004:009
xf openssh-scp-file-overwrite(16323)
statements via4
contributor Mark J Cox
lastmodified 2007-03-14
organization Red Hat
statement Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 is not vulnerable to this issue as it contains a backported patch.
Last major update 07-03-2011 - 21:15
Published 18-08-2004 - 00:00
Last modified 10-10-2017 - 21:29
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